Analysis of Contextual Computer-aided Design (CAD) Exercises Conference Paper uri icon

abstract

  • Computer-Aided Design (CAD) technologies are an essential part of modern design endeavors. In today's industry, engineers use CAD models throughout their work. This makes CAD education crucial. However current CAD education has typically focused on narrow skills related to particular CAD software. The skills necessary to adapt new CAD software and effectively utilize the existing models in modified designs are not the primary emphasis in CAD education. In this paper, the most recent findings of a three-year NSF supported iterative project are discussed. The project goals are to examine the role of adaptive expertise in CAD modeling and investigate the impact of a learner-centered contextual exercise on students' modeling behavior and other educational outcomes. This paper builds on previously reported work. Findings that combine: participating students' responses to an Adaptive Expertise Survey (AES), coded interviews with students and practicing engineers, and the participants' demographic information are reported. Research activity participants include students from Texas A&M University (TAMU) and Prairie View A&M University (PVAMU). At each campus, a control group and an experimental group were formed to complete modeling exercises. Students in the experimental group completed a contextual exercise and created CAD models based on some objects that the students were familiar with and frequently used in their daily lives. Students in the control group were asked to model an object that was similar to a textbook exercise. A summary of the data collected and the statistical relationships among the study variables are presented. The study's context and implications for CAD education are discussed. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2013.

author list (cited authors)

  • Ozturk, E., Yalvac, B., Peng, X., Valverde, L., McGary, P., & Johnson, M.

citation count

  • 0

publication date

  • June 2013