Perez, Flor (2011-12). The Impact of Traditional Gender Role Beliefs and Relationship Status on Depression in Mexican American Women: A Study in Self- Discrepancies. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Limited research has been conducted to examine traditional female Mexican American gender role beliefs and its impact on depression. In order to address the research questions, this dissertation developed two manuscripts. The first manuscript is a literature review that examines research concerning depression, Mexican American female gender role beliefs, and Self-Discrepancy theory. The second manuscript is a quantitative study that investigates the impact gender role beliefs and partner status has on depression in Mexican American women. Furthermore, the second manuscript suggests variables that contribute to depression in Mexican American women and recommendations for clinicians. The aim of the second manuscript is to examine the literature concerning depression in Mexican American women and the ways in which traditional gender role beliefs and self-discrepancies may impact Mexican American women's mental health. This dissertation begins by examining the literature concerning depression in Mexican American women. It then explores Mexican American women's gender role socialization, including a review of the values that are taught through this process. This study then provides an in depth inspection of the ideal of marianismo, which guides traditional Mexican American women's gender role beliefs. Next it progresses to discuss Self-Discrepancy theory and possible mental health outcomes. Examples of possible self-discrepancies related to traditional Mexican American women's gender role beliefs are provided to illustrate how depression may occur when self-discrepancies are present. Finally, it provides recommendations for clinicians who work with depressed Mexican American women. The second manuscript examines the impact of traditional gender role beliefs and partner status on depression in a sample of 325 Mexican American women. It is hypothesized that an interaction effect between partner status and gender role beliefs will be found, whereas Mexican American women who are unpartnered and have traditional gender role beliefs will experience a greater amount of depression, due to the presence of a discrepancy. Contrarily, results from the analysis of variance (ANOVA) found no interaction between partner status and gender role beliefs on depression. The manuscript provides possible explanations for such findings. In addition, results from a hierarchical regression indicate that level of education and the family pillar aspect of marianismo significantly impact depression in Mexican American women.
  • Limited research has been conducted to examine traditional female Mexican American gender role beliefs and its impact on depression. In order to address the research questions, this dissertation developed two manuscripts. The first manuscript is a literature review that examines research concerning depression, Mexican American female gender role beliefs, and Self-Discrepancy theory. The second manuscript is a quantitative study that investigates the impact gender role beliefs and partner status has on depression in Mexican American women. Furthermore, the second manuscript suggests variables that contribute to depression in Mexican American women and recommendations for clinicians.



    The aim of the second manuscript is to examine the literature concerning depression in Mexican American women and the ways in which traditional gender role beliefs and self-discrepancies may impact Mexican American women's mental health. This dissertation begins by examining the literature concerning depression in Mexican American women. It then explores Mexican American women's gender role socialization, including a review of the values that are taught through this process. This study then provides an in depth inspection of the ideal of marianismo, which guides traditional Mexican American women's gender role beliefs. Next it progresses to discuss Self-Discrepancy theory and possible mental health outcomes. Examples of possible self-discrepancies related to traditional Mexican American women's gender role beliefs are provided to illustrate how depression may occur when self-discrepancies are present. Finally, it provides recommendations for clinicians who work with depressed Mexican American women.



    The second manuscript examines the impact of traditional gender role beliefs and partner status on depression in a sample of 325 Mexican American women. It is hypothesized that an interaction effect between partner status and gender role beliefs will be found, whereas Mexican American women who are unpartnered and have traditional gender role beliefs will experience a greater amount of depression, due to the presence of a discrepancy. Contrarily, results from the analysis of variance (ANOVA) found no interaction between partner status and gender role beliefs on depression. The manuscript provides possible explanations for such findings. In addition, results from a hierarchical regression indicate that level of education and the family pillar aspect of marianismo significantly impact depression in Mexican American women.

publication date

  • December 2011