James, Adrian M (2014-08). Experiential Learning Theory, Transformational Leadership, and the Supplemental Instruction Leader: An Exploration of their Relationship and Influence on Recurring Attendance to Supplemental Instruction Sessions. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • The purpose of this study was to explore the learning preferences and leadership behaviors of Supplemental Instruction (SI) leaders at Texas A&M University, and the impact of those preferences on recurring attendance to their sessions. The Learning Style Inventory (LSI) 3.1, the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ), and a demographic instrument were administered to 34 SI leaders employed in the fall 2013 semester. A majority of participants preferred a diverging or accommodating learning style and perceived themselves to display transformational leadership behaviors the most. Analysis of variance and Pearson product-moment correlations revealed that learning preferences and leadership behaviors did not have a significant relationship with recurring attendance. Significant relationships for variables on the LSI and MLQ were found for transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and learning preferences. Most of these relationships were found for preference for transforming information. Literature concerning the SI leader is narrow. Supplementary studies exploring their characteristics, preferences, and personality are needed. The relationship between leadership and learning is an area that can benefit from further research.
  • The purpose of this study was to explore the learning preferences and leadership behaviors of Supplemental Instruction (SI) leaders at Texas A&M University, and the impact of those preferences on recurring attendance to their sessions. The Learning Style Inventory (LSI) 3.1, the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (MLQ), and a demographic instrument were administered to 34 SI leaders employed in the fall 2013 semester.

    A majority of participants preferred a diverging or accommodating learning style and perceived themselves to display transformational leadership behaviors the most. Analysis of variance and Pearson product-moment correlations revealed that learning preferences and leadership behaviors did not have a significant relationship with recurring attendance. Significant relationships for variables on the LSI and MLQ were found for transformational and transactional leadership behaviors and learning preferences. Most of these relationships were found for preference for transforming information.

    Literature concerning the SI leader is narrow. Supplementary studies exploring their characteristics, preferences, and personality are needed. The relationship between leadership and learning is an area that can benefit from further research.

publication date

  • August 2014