Dietary Intakes of Amino Acids and Other Nutrients by Adult Humans Chapter uri icon

abstract

  • Measuring usual dietary intake in freely living humans is difficult to accomplish. As a part of our recent study, a food frequency questionnaire was completed by healthy adult men and women at days 0 and 90 of the study. Data from the food questionnaire were analyzed with a nutrient analysis program (www.Harvardsffq.date). Healthy men and women consumed protein as 19–20% and 17–19% of their total energy intakes, respectively, with animal protein representing about 75 and 70% of their total protein intakes, respectively. The intake of each nutritionally essential amino acid (EAA) by the persons exceeded that recommended for healthy adults with a minimal physical activity. In all individuals, the dietary intake of leucine was the highest, followed by lysine, valine, and isoleucine in descending order, and the ingestion of amino acids that are synthesizable de novo in animal cells (AASAs) was about 20% greater than that of total EAAs. The intake of each AASA met those recommended for healthy adults with a minimal physical activity. Intakes of some AASAs (alanine, arginine, aspartate, glutamate, and glycine) from a typical diet providing 90–110 g food protein/day does not meet the requirements of adults with an intensive physical activity. Within the male or female group, there were not significant differences in the dietary intakes of all amino acids between days 0 and 90 of the study, and this was also true for nearly all other essential nutrients. Our findings will help to improve amino acid nutrition and health in both the general population and exercising individuals.

author list (cited authors)

  • Sarkar, T. R., McNeal, C. J., Meininger, C. J., Niu, Y., Mallick, B. K., Carroll, R. J., & Wu, G.

editor list (cited editors)

  • Wu, G.

Book Title

  • Amino Acids in Nutrition and Health. Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology

publication date

  • January 1, 2021 11:11 AM