Tabron, Lolita Antoinette (2016-08). The Effects of the Texas Top 10% Plan on High School to University Feeder Patterns and Diploma Types. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This study was an investigation of the effects of the University of Texas admission cap on a school's odds of being a Texas Flagship feeder school and a student's likelihood of earning a college preparatory diploma. Multinomial Logistic Regression (MLR), Logistic Regression (LR), and Difference-in-Differences (DID) models were used to test whether high school to university sending patterns and types of high school diploma attained by Texas high school seniors could be correctly predicted from knowledge of important K-12 school characteristics and demographic profiles. Findings were based on changes in diploma types earned and feeder school status before and after the UT Top 10% automatic admission cap. Findings indicate the UT admission cap reduced the number of high schools that sent students to Texas A&M and the University of Texas. Less than 5% of Texas public high schools sent at least 8% of their senior class to either Flagship school. A redistribution of Texas Flagship feeder schools might have occurred rather than the addition of new Texas Flagship feeder high schools. The UT admission cap also influenced the rigor of students' course-taking behavior to be eligible for the Texas Top 10% automatic admission guarantee. After the UT admission cap, more students earned a college preparatory diploma. However, they earned it by taking less rigorous coursework to qualify for the Top 10% automatic admission guarantee. Findings from this study will help K-12 administrators, legislators, and laities understand which school-based factors are related to students taking more rigorous coursework and draw more students from traditionally marginalized groups to enroll in more selective universities.

publication date

  • August 2016