HOW FIRM REPUTATION SHAPES MANAGERIAL DISCRETION Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Academy of Management Review Reputation is not always a good thing. Despite the established benefits of a good reputation, recent research has elucidated the burdens and liabilities it can bring about, particularly following a crisis or stakeholder disappointment. However, managers spend much of their time avoiding such extreme events rather than responding to them, and we know very little about how reputation influences managers everyday decisions. We address this issue by offering a theoretical framework to explain how reputation shapes managers perceptions of their discretion as they attempt to navigate stakeholder expectations. In doing so we clarify and elaborate two forms of reputationthose rooted in a firms behaviors and those rooted in a firms outcomesas well as two forms of discretionmanagers perceived latitude of actions and their perceived latitude of objectivesthereby synthesizing and extending recent work in both the reputation literature and discretion literature. The intersection of social evaluations and managerial decisions remains an exciting and fruitful avenue of research, and we aim to illustrate how the insights from the meticulous efforts of scholars in both fields would benefit from further cross-pollination.

published proceedings

  • ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT REVIEW

altmetric score

  • 8

author list (cited authors)

  • Parker, O., Krause, R., & Devers, C. E.

citation count

  • 26

complete list of authors

  • Parker, Owen||Krause, Ryan||Devers, Cynthia E

publication date

  • January 1, 2019 11:11 AM