Satietin: Route of injection, dose response, effect on food and water intake and on running-wheel activity in the rat Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Semipurified satietin significantly (p less than 0.05) reduced food intake when injected subcutaneously at 10, 15, 20 mg/kg into 48 hr fasted rats with no indication of a dose response. When infused intracerebroventricularly (ICV) at 12.5, 25 and 50 micrograms/rat (10 microliter vol) into ad lib fed rats at the end of the light period there was no effect on food intake for the first hour but 24 hr food intake was (p less than 0.001) reduced at all doses. The ICV dose response curve was shallow, with similar suppression at both 12.5 and 25 micrograms doses, but a (p less than 0.05) greater suppression with the 50 micrograms dose. An ICV threshold between 6.25 micrograms and 12.5 micrograms appears to exist since no suppression occurred after a dose of 6.25 micrograms. Four consecutive daily ICV infusions of satietin (25 micrograms/rat) in two rats progressively suppressed food intake to low levels, suggesting a cumulative effect. Following termination of satietin treatment daily food intake slowly returned towards normal without evidence of rebound feeding. In other ad lib fed rats, four ICV infusions of semipurified satietin, on days alternated with no infusion, reduced food intake (p less than 0.001), water intake (p less than 0.003) and running wheel activity (p less than 0.001) on the first day of injection but not on subsequent injection days. Suppression of activity approached significance on the second injection day. Highly purified satietin infused ICV produced similar responses. These findings may indicate a general disruption of behavior by satietin, thus, it may not play a physiological role in feeding behavior because of its apparent non-specificity.

author list (cited authors)

  • Mendel, V. E., Bellinger, L. L., Williams, F. E., & Iredale, R. A.

citation count

  • 10

publication date

  • February 1986