McDonald, Camille M. (2010-08). Examing the Nonroutine Acts of Emergency Workers and How They Become Routine. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • The purpose of this study is to determine how nonroutine acts performed by iii trained emergency workers developed into routine emergency acts and skills. I will be specifically looking for concepts that are common throughout the different types of emergency workers that will be interviewed. The data is gathered from focus groups that were recruited from classes on campus. In particular the results depict some very common techniques used in training that allowed the workers to feel confident about their role in emergencies. These tended to include repetition of "classroom training, "but more importantly from the viewpoint of the workers, repetition of simulated emergencies. The development of autonomy in decision making was an important facet for workers whose work "territory" was varied; however, autonomy was rarely stressed for those in relatively constant surroundings such as pools. Several commonalities were found throughout each field. These included interruptions, self-efficacy, the use of judgment and tacit knowledge. Many of the participants also expressed the same sentiment towards their feelings of the training and its efficiency. Some research will also show attempts to change policy and training within emergency workers in order to improve job performance and enhance the safety of the public as well. I will include a small statistical appendix that looks at the satisfaction level of evacuees who fled to Houston, Texas when Hurricane Katrina hit. Five specific factors were examined and regressed to determine satisfaction levels. Only two factors showed any type of significance. As the discussion will indicate, certain previous factors, before the hurricane hit, are believed to be the cause of these particular results.
  • The purpose of this study is to determine how nonroutine acts performed by
    iii
    trained emergency workers developed into routine emergency acts and skills. I will be
    specifically looking for concepts that are common throughout the different types of
    emergency workers that will be interviewed. The data is gathered from focus groups
    that were recruited from classes on campus. In particular the results depict some very
    common techniques used in training that allowed the workers to feel confident about
    their role in emergencies. These tended to include repetition of "classroom training, "but
    more importantly from the viewpoint of the workers, repetition of simulated
    emergencies. The development of autonomy in decision making was an important facet
    for workers whose work "territory" was varied; however, autonomy was rarely stressed
    for those in relatively constant surroundings such as pools.
    Several commonalities were found throughout each field. These included
    interruptions, self-efficacy, the use of judgment and tacit knowledge. Many of the
    participants also expressed the same sentiment towards their feelings of the training and its efficiency. Some research will also show attempts to change policy and training
    within emergency workers in order to improve job performance and enhance the safety
    of the public as well.
    I will include a small statistical appendix that looks at the satisfaction level of
    evacuees who fled to Houston, Texas when Hurricane Katrina hit. Five specific factors
    were examined and regressed to determine satisfaction levels. Only two factors showed
    any type of significance. As the discussion will indicate, certain previous factors, before
    the hurricane hit, are believed to be the cause of these particular results.

publication date

  • August 2010