Parish III, Allen S. (2008-05). Pursuit and evasion games: semi-direct and cooperative control methods. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Pursuit and evasion games have garnered much research attention since the class of problems was first posed over a half century ago. With wide applicability to both civilian and military problems, the study of pursuit and evasion games showed much early promise. Early work generally focused on analytical solutions to games involving a single pursuer and a single evader. These solutions generally assumed simple system dynamics to facilitate convergence to a solution. More recently, numerical techniques have been utilized to solve more difficult problems. While many sophisticated numerical tools exist for standard optimization and optimal control problems, developing a more complete set of numerical tools for pursuit and evasion games is still a developing topic of research. This thesis extends the current body of numeric solution tools in two ways. First, an existing approach that modifies sophisticated optimization tools to solve two player pursuer and evasion games is extended to incorporate a class of state inequality constraints. Several classical problems are solved to illustrate the e?cacy of the new approach. Second, a new cooperation metric is introduced into the system objective function for multi-player pursuit and evasion games. This new cooperation metric encourages multiple pursuers to surround and then proceed to capture an evader. Several examples are provided to demonstrate this new cooperation metric.
  • Pursuit and evasion games have garnered much research attention since the
    class of problems was first posed over a half century ago. With wide applicability to
    both civilian and military problems, the study of pursuit and evasion games showed
    much early promise. Early work generally focused on analytical solutions to games
    involving a single pursuer and a single evader. These solutions generally assumed simple system dynamics to facilitate convergence to a solution. More recently, numerical
    techniques have been utilized to solve more difficult problems. While many sophisticated numerical tools exist for standard optimization and optimal control problems,
    developing a more complete set of numerical tools for pursuit and evasion games is
    still a developing topic of research.
    This thesis extends the current body of numeric solution tools in two ways.
    First, an existing approach that modifies sophisticated optimization tools to solve
    two player pursuer and evasion games is extended to incorporate a class of state
    inequality constraints. Several classical problems are solved to illustrate the e?cacy
    of the new approach. Second, a new cooperation metric is introduced into the system
    objective function for multi-player pursuit and evasion games. This new cooperation
    metric encourages multiple pursuers to surround and then proceed to capture an
    evader. Several examples are provided to demonstrate this new cooperation metric.

publication date

  • May 2008