Love, Tony Paul (2008-12). Construction and validation of a behavioral measure of role-taking. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This study examines a new method for conceptualizing and measuring roletaking ability. Role-taking is defined in a manner that facilitates further theory building and testing. The task of designing and validating a measure of role-taking that departs from the self-evaluative measures currently used is undertaken and validated with an experimental design. A computer-based survey instrument is created consisting of video and written vignettes designed to test subjects' ability to predict their study partner's behavior. It is found that one type of vignette is more suitable for measuring role-taking accuracy than is the other. Females, regardless of experimental condition, record higher role-taking scores than do their male counterparts. Subjects' self-reported role-taking accuracy is not correlated with their actual role-taking accuracy scores. Because this is the case, it leads to a re-thinking of the meaning of studies that use self-reported ability as the sole measure of role-taking ability. An additional finding is that participants seem to overestimate individual differences. Personality factors measured by the Big Five Inventory were not correlated with role-taking accuracy.
  • This study examines a new method for conceptualizing and measuring roletaking
    ability. Role-taking is defined in a manner that facilitates further theory building
    and testing. The task of designing and validating a measure of role-taking that departs
    from the self-evaluative measures currently used is undertaken and validated with an
    experimental design. A computer-based survey instrument is created consisting of video
    and written vignettes designed to test subjects' ability to predict their study partner's
    behavior. It is found that one type of vignette is more suitable for measuring role-taking
    accuracy than is the other. Females, regardless of experimental condition, record higher
    role-taking scores than do their male counterparts. Subjects' self-reported role-taking
    accuracy is not correlated with their actual role-taking accuracy scores. Because this is
    the case, it leads to a re-thinking of the meaning of studies that use self-reported ability
    as the sole measure of role-taking ability. An additional finding is that participants seem
    to overestimate individual differences. Personality factors measured by the Big Five
    Inventory were not correlated with role-taking accuracy.

publication date

  • December 2008