Camarillo, Omar (2015-05). A Content Analysis of the Coverage of Gun Trafficking Along the U.S.-MEXICO Border. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This dissertation analyzed how the media on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border portrayed the issue of gun trafficking's into Mexico and its impact on Mexico's border violence. National newspapers from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border were analyzed from January 2009 through January 2012, The New York Times for the U.S. and El Universal for Mexico, which resulted in a sample of 602 newspaper articles. Qualitative research methods were utilized to collect and analyze the data, specifically content analysis. Drawing on a theoretical framework of social problems and framing this study addressed how gun trafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border impacted the drug related violence that is ongoing in Mexico, how gun trafficking was portrayed as a social problem by the media, and how the media depicted the victims of drug related violence. This study revealed six framing devices, "the blame game," "worthy and unworthy victims," "positive aspects of gun trafficking," "negative aspects of gun trafficking," "indirect mention of gun trafficking," and "direct mention of gun trafficking" that were utilized by The New York Times and El Universal to discuss and frame the issue gun trafficking into Mexico and its impact on Mexico's border violence. Gun trafficking into Mexico was found to have met all three of Jamrozik and Nocella's criteria for a social problem. It had a societal origin in the media of 2008, constituted a threat toward the freedoms and values of the citizens of Mexico, and was found to be amendable to solution through cooperation between the U.S-Mexican governments. In the end, this dissertation understands that gun trafficking into Mexico along with the supply and demand of drugs are social problems that needs to be addressed by both the American and Mexican governments in order to prevent further drug related violence.
  • This dissertation analyzed how the media on both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border portrayed the issue of gun trafficking's into Mexico and its impact on Mexico's border violence. National newspapers from both sides of the U.S.-Mexico border were analyzed from January 2009 through January 2012, The New York Times for the U.S. and El Universal for Mexico, which resulted in a sample of 602 newspaper articles. Qualitative research methods were utilized to collect and analyze the data, specifically content analysis. Drawing on a theoretical framework of social problems and framing this study addressed how gun trafficking along the U.S.-Mexico border impacted the drug related violence that is ongoing in Mexico, how gun trafficking was portrayed as a social problem by the media, and how the media depicted the victims of drug related violence.



    This study revealed six framing devices, "the blame game," "worthy and unworthy victims," "positive aspects of gun trafficking," "negative aspects of gun trafficking," "indirect mention of gun trafficking," and "direct mention of gun trafficking" that were utilized by The New York Times and El Universal to discuss and frame the issue gun trafficking into Mexico and its impact on Mexico's border violence. Gun trafficking into Mexico was found to have met all three of Jamrozik and Nocella's criteria for a social problem. It had a societal origin in the media of 2008, constituted a threat toward the freedoms and values of the citizens of Mexico, and was found to be amendable to solution through cooperation between the U.S-Mexican governments. In the end, this dissertation understands that gun trafficking into Mexico along with the supply and demand of drugs are social problems that needs to be addressed by both the American and Mexican governments in order to prevent further drug related violence.

publication date

  • May 2015