Salzar, Tricia Lynn (2020-01). Impact of Alternative Workstation Design on Discomfort, Computer Utilization and Sedentary Activity at Work. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Utilization of alternative workstations have become increasingly popular with researchers investigating workstation utilization trends in various populations. Much of the literature reports mixed results, likely due to the different types of workstations that have been lumped into the sit-to-stand category. Upon investigation, a more accurate all-inclusive term of stand capable workstations was identified (Pickens et al., 2016). Previous studies have separated the stand-capable group into two categories: (1) a stand-biased group that works at a workstation that has a fixed height and a stool, which allows them to sit when desired; and (2) a sit-stand group that can adjust their work surface height to accommodate both standing and sitting work with the help of a traditional office chair. Both the HSC Workstation Study and the HSC Stand-Biased Workstation HSC Stand-Biased Workstation Follow-up Study used these definitions to characterize participant's workstations. In addition, both of these studies utilized a questionnaire and two objective data collection tools to quantifiably measure computer utilization and occupational activity. The HSC Workstation Study found that stand-biased users typed more words per day and made more errors than their traditional counterparts, but they were not statistically different when the error rate (errors/500 words) were evaluated. The study also found that stand-biased workers spend more time standing and less time seated at the workstation than their traditional counterparts did, but they have statistically less transitions than either the sit-stand or traditional groups. The HSC Stand-Biased Workstation Follow-up Study indicated that the majority of individuals who began using a stand-biased workstation continued over the 6-year time period with only 28% changing workstation types. Over time, the group reported an increase in the number of days that they walk, but did not report any statistical difference in time spent seated or standing to work. The RSI-OES study lumped all sit-stand use into one group as a definition or listing of the type of unit used was not provided. However, the study utilized the same data logging software program to characterize computer utilization finding that sit-stand users spend more time actively computing. This included more active keyboard and more active mouse use than their traditional counterparts.

publication date

  • May 2020
  • January 2020
  • May 2020
  • May 2020
  • May 2020
  • May 2020
  • May 2020