Mayerich, David Matthew (2003-12). Acquisition and reconstruction of brain tissue using knife-edge scanning microscopy. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • A fast method for gathering large-scale data sets through the serial sectioning of brain tissue is described. These data sets are retrieved using knife-edge scanning microscopy, a new technique developed in the Brain Networks Laboratory at Texas A&M University. This technique allows the imaging of tissue as it is cut by an ultramicrotome. In this thesis the development of a knife-edge scanner is discussed as well as the scanning techniques used to retrieve high-resolution data sets. Problems in knife-edge scanning microscopy, such as illumination, knife chatter, and focusing are discussed. Techniques are also shown to reduce these problems so that serial sections of tissue can be sampled at resolutions that are high enough to allow reconstruction of neurons at the cellular level.
  • A fast method for gathering large-scale data sets through the serial sectioning of

    brain tissue is described. These data sets are retrieved using knife-edge scanning

    microscopy, a new technique developed in the Brain Networks Laboratory at Texas

    A&M University. This technique allows the imaging of tissue as it is cut by an

    ultramicrotome.

    In this thesis the development of a knife-edge scanner is discussed as well as the

    scanning techniques used to retrieve high-resolution data sets. Problems in knife-edge

    scanning microscopy, such as illumination, knife chatter, and focusing are discussed.

    Techniques are also shown to reduce these problems so that serial sections of tissue can

    be sampled at resolutions that are high enough to allow reconstruction of neurons at the

    cellular level.

publication date

  • December 2003