Rocka, Timothy Dee (2003-08). Future agricultural systems competencies of beginning Texas agricultural science teachers as determined by agricultural education professionals and administrators of agricultural education programs: a Delphi study. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • It has always been the initiative of agricultural education to provide our American society with the educational "needs of the day" (Meyer, 1999). As our nation and state enters a new era, it is fitting for an examination of the future needs of agricultural education teachers. In Texas, the State Board of Educator Certification (SBEC) currently has no assessment of the agricultural systems knowledge of agricultural education teaching candidates. This study examines the future agricultural systems competencies of beginning agricultural education teachers. Two groups, agricultural education professionals and administrators of agricultural education programs, were asked "what the future agricultural systems competencies of beginning agricultural science teachers should be." Two independent panels, the first composed of eleven (11) educators and the second composed of twelve (12) school administrators, were identified to serve as experts. A three-round Delphi was used to collect the data. Each round allowed the expert panelists to converge to a consensus of agreement that identified future competencies for beginning agricultural science teachers. Panelists were asked to provide competencies associated with the five powerful and fundamental conceptual areas of biological, physical, social, informational, and other integrative science which underpin agricultural education (Paul, 1995). The study revealed a three-fourths consensus with one-hundred (100) future competencies necessary for beginning Texas agricultural science teachers. Among these competencies twenty-three (23) were associated with the biological sciences, twenty-seven (27) were associated with the physical sciences, twenty-five (25) were associated with the social sciences, twenty (20) were associated with the informational sciences, and five (5) were associated with other integrative sciences. The study found seventeen (17) "highly recommended" topics and six (6) "recommended" topics related to the future agricultural systems competencies identified by the expert panelists. Cooper and Layard (2001) reveal that our future society will be much more technologically and sociologically advanced requiring teacher preparation institutions and state agencies associated with teacher preparation to develop new, innovative programs to better prepare tomorrow's educator. This study recommends that new agricultural systems standards be developed to adequately prepare future beginning agricultural science teachers.
  • It has always been the initiative of agricultural education to provide our American society with the educational "needs of the day" (Meyer, 1999). As our nation and state enters a new era, it is fitting for an examination of the future needs of agricultural education teachers. In Texas, the State Board of Educator Certification (SBEC) currently has no assessment of the agricultural systems knowledge of agricultural education teaching candidates. This study examines the future agricultural systems competencies of beginning agricultural education teachers. Two groups, agricultural education professionals and administrators of agricultural education programs, were asked "what the future agricultural systems competencies of beginning agricultural science teachers should be."

    Two independent panels, the first composed of eleven (11) educators and the second composed of twelve (12) school administrators, were identified to serve as experts. A three-round Delphi was used to collect the data. Each round allowed the expert panelists to converge to a consensus of agreement that identified future competencies for beginning agricultural science teachers. Panelists were asked to provide competencies associated with the five powerful and fundamental conceptual areas of biological, physical, social, informational, and other integrative science which underpin agricultural education (Paul, 1995).

    The study revealed a three-fourths consensus with one-hundred (100) future competencies necessary for beginning Texas agricultural science teachers. Among these competencies twenty-three (23) were associated with the biological sciences, twenty-seven (27) were associated with the physical sciences, twenty-five (25) were associated with the social sciences, twenty (20) were associated with the informational sciences, and five (5) were associated with other integrative sciences.

    The study found seventeen (17) "highly recommended" topics and six (6) "recommended" topics related to the future agricultural systems competencies identified by the expert panelists. Cooper and Layard (2001) reveal that our future society will be much more technologically and sociologically advanced requiring teacher preparation institutions and state agencies associated with teacher preparation to develop new, innovative programs to better prepare tomorrow's educator. This study recommends that new agricultural systems standards be developed to adequately prepare future beginning agricultural science teachers.

publication date

  • August 2003