Yoon, Bo Hee (2007-08). Asian residential segregation in Houston, Texas. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This thesis investigates the residential segregation of the Asian population in Houston considering segregation among Asian groups as well as segregation of Asians from broader non-Asian groups, namely whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Methods applied in this thesis draw on previous works on residential segregation and measure segregation using indices of exposure and isolation and indices of uneven distribution. The demographic and historical backgrounds of Asian populations are reviewed to identify potential reasons for Asian residential segregation. New major findings from my analysis are that Asians have socioeconomic status similar to whites and, thus, have higher socioeconomic status than blacks and Hispanics who have low socioeconomic status. Other major findings are that Asians have moderate segregation from whites, high segregation from Hispanics and even higher segregation from blacks. Detailed Asian groups are mostly moderately segregated from whites and are more highly segregated from Hispanics and blacks. Also, Asian groups are sometimes highly segregated from each other. In conclusion, residential segregation of both broad racial and ethnic groups and Asians are affected by education and income in Houston area including other factors. Based on my analysis, I predict that the pattern of Asian residential segregation will still follow the previous patterns based on education and income.
  • This thesis investigates the residential segregation of the Asian population in
    Houston considering segregation among Asian groups as well as segregation of Asians
    from broader non-Asian groups, namely whites, blacks, and Hispanics. Methods applied
    in this thesis draw on previous works on residential segregation and measure segregation
    using indices of exposure and isolation and indices of uneven distribution. The
    demographic and historical backgrounds of Asian populations are reviewed to identify
    potential reasons for Asian residential segregation. New major findings from my
    analysis are that Asians have socioeconomic status similar to whites and, thus, have
    higher socioeconomic status than blacks and Hispanics who have low socioeconomic
    status. Other major findings are that Asians have moderate segregation from whites, high
    segregation from Hispanics and even higher segregation from blacks. Detailed Asian
    groups are mostly moderately segregated from whites and are more highly segregated
    from Hispanics and blacks. Also, Asian groups are sometimes highly segregated from
    each other. In conclusion, residential segregation of both broad racial and ethnic groups
    and Asians are affected by education and income in Houston area including other factors.
    Based on my analysis, I predict that the pattern of Asian residential segregation will still
    follow the previous patterns based on education and income.

publication date

  • August 2007