Vuia-Riser, Jennifer (2016-12). Comparison of the Ability of Buffered Peptone Water and Neutralizing Buffered Peptone Water to Overcome Antimicrobial Carryover in Chicken Carcasses and Parts. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Poultry is a known reservoir of Salmonella enterica, and poultry products have been repeatedly identified as transmission vehicles for this pathogen. Poultry processors have incorporated food safety antimicrobial interventions during processing, such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA), to assist in reducing foodborne pathogen loads on raw carcasses and parts. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) versus neutralizing Buffered Peptone Water (nBPW) to overcome antimicrobial carryover on whole chicken carcasses and chicken parts rinse collections during commercial harvest and fabrication. The null hypotheses for studies were that all rinse fluids tested (Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS), BPW, and nBPW) would have equivalent means for presumptive-positive Salmonella recovery. Detection for S. enterica was carried out according to biochemical testing methods designated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for raw chicken carcasses and parts rinses. Recorded antimicrobial concentrations for PAA and CPC solutions on sampling days were 0.05%?0.007% and 0.50%?0.04%, respectively. The average presumptive-positive Salmonella recovery rates for PBS (control), BPW, and nBPW for chicken carcasses were 0%, 0%, and 13%, respectively, while rates for PBS, BPW, and nBPW for chicken parts were 4.8%, 12%, and 14%, respectively. Recovery rates for presumptive-positive Salmonella on whole carcass rinses differed as a result of rinse fluid for only nBPW (P<0.001, n<20). Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in presumptive-positive Salmonella recoveries for chicken parts as a function of rinse fluid (PBS, BPW, nBPW) (P= 0.25, n=14). Given the outcomes of experiments, the null hypothesis was rejected for carcasses, but for parts, the corresponding null hypothesis was not able to be rejected. While these data show there was neutralizing ability for nBPW for carcass rinse collections, it does not provide evidence that nBPW is more effective as an antimicrobial neutralizing rinse fluid versus PBS or BPW for chicken parts. Further research must be conducted to determine if a stronger neutralizing formulation is required for parts rinses. Research should also be expanded to other chicken edible parts that are sampled per USDA-FSIS regulations to determine if results are similar to those obtained in the present study.
  • Poultry is a known reservoir of Salmonella enterica, and poultry products have been repeatedly identified as transmission vehicles for this pathogen. Poultry processors have incorporated food safety antimicrobial interventions during processing, such as cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and peroxyacetic acid (PAA), to assist in reducing foodborne pathogen loads on raw carcasses and parts. The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of Buffered Peptone Water (BPW) versus neutralizing Buffered Peptone Water (nBPW) to overcome antimicrobial carryover on whole chicken carcasses and chicken parts rinse collections during commercial harvest and fabrication. The null hypotheses for studies were that all rinse fluids tested (Phosphate Buffered Saline (PBS), BPW, and nBPW) would have equivalent means for presumptive-positive Salmonella recovery.

    Detection for S. enterica was carried out according to biochemical testing methods designated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for raw chicken carcasses and parts rinses. Recorded antimicrobial concentrations for PAA and CPC solutions on sampling days were 0.05%?0.007% and 0.50%?0.04%, respectively. The average presumptive-positive Salmonella recovery rates for PBS (control), BPW, and nBPW for chicken carcasses were 0%, 0%, and 13%, respectively, while rates for PBS, BPW, and nBPW for chicken parts were 4.8%, 12%, and 14%, respectively. Recovery rates for presumptive-positive Salmonella on whole carcass rinses differed as a result of rinse fluid for only nBPW (P<0.001, n<20). Statistical analysis indicated no significant difference in presumptive-positive Salmonella recoveries for chicken parts as a function of rinse fluid (PBS, BPW, nBPW) (P= 0.25, n=14).

    Given the outcomes of experiments, the null hypothesis was rejected for carcasses, but for parts, the corresponding null hypothesis was not able to be rejected. While these data show there was neutralizing ability for nBPW for carcass rinse collections, it does not provide evidence that nBPW is more effective as an antimicrobial neutralizing rinse fluid versus PBS or BPW for chicken parts. Further research must be conducted to determine if a stronger neutralizing formulation is required for parts rinses. Research should also be expanded to other chicken edible parts that are sampled per USDA-FSIS regulations to determine if results are similar to those obtained in the present study.

publication date

  • December 2016