Lee, Hyun Wu (2014-05). British Troops, Colonists, Indians, and Slaves in Southeastern North America, 1756-1763. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This work recasts the world of the North American Southeast during the Seven Years' War by examining the intersecting stories of British soldiers, colonists, Indians, and enslaved and free Africans. Populated with diverse Indians, Europeans, and enslaved and free Africans, the Southeast remained a vibrant and fiercely contested space that can be viewed as a slice of the Atlantic world in which the larger, external forces of imperialism and market capitalism collided throughout the eighteenth century. It also argues that the political, social, and intercultural dimensions of the Seven Years' War relations between British soldiers and colonists cannot be fully understood without examining the experiences of Indians and enslaved Africans--especially in the Southeast. While British soldiers often judged the inhabitants of the Southeast based on their notions of race, class, and gender to maintain their identity as King's Troops, these differences did not preclude them from pursuing economic interests with the local planters or share social, physical spaces together with the Indians and enslaved Africans.
  • This work recasts the world of the North American Southeast during the Seven
    Years' War by examining the intersecting stories of British soldiers, colonists, Indians,
    and enslaved and free Africans. Populated with diverse Indians, Europeans, and enslaved
    and free Africans, the Southeast remained a vibrant and fiercely contested space that can
    be viewed as a slice of the Atlantic world in which the larger, external forces of
    imperialism and market capitalism collided throughout the eighteenth century.

    It also argues that the political, social, and intercultural dimensions of the Seven
    Years' War relations between British soldiers and colonists cannot be fully understood
    without examining the experiences of Indians and enslaved Africans--especially in the
    Southeast. While British soldiers often judged the inhabitants of the Southeast based on
    their notions of race, class, and gender to maintain their identity as King's Troops, these
    differences did not preclude them from pursuing economic interests with the local
    planters or share social, physical spaces together with the Indians and enslaved Africans.

publication date

  • May 2014