Zank, Gail Marie (1993-05). The effects of cognitive style, task characteristics and decision outcome on knowledge utilization in marketing decisions. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Knowledge utilization represents a relatively new area of study in the marketing discipline. This dissertation focuses on expanding this area of study by examining the knowledge utilization process. This dissertation examines factors affecting information utilization. A model delineating the relationship between cognitive style, perceived risk, perceived programmability, prior knowledge, perceived credibility, perceived usefulness and utilization is presented and empirically tested. Also tested is the effect of the decision outcome on utilization. A laboratory experiment was used. The sample consisted of 200 undergraduate students at a southeastern university. ANOVA, t-tests, regression, MRA and path analysis were used to test the hypothesized relationships. The findings support the hypotheses that the perceived usefulness of information changes over the knowledge utilization process and the decision outcome affects reported utilization. Also, supported were the following hypotheses: (1) the greater the perceived programmability of the decision task, the lesser the perceived risk; (2) the greater the perceived credibility of the information, the greater the perceived usefulness of the information; (3) the greater the perceived credibility of the information, the greater the utilization of the information; and (4) the greater the perceived usefulness of the information, the greater the utilization of the information. The study findings suggest that there are other variables that influence knowledge utilization and more importantly, knowledge utilization needs to be examined as a process.

publication date

  • May 1993
  • July 1993