Hoffmann, Leo (2012-08). Introduction and Selection of Photoperiod Sensitive Sorghum Genotypes for Agronomic Fitness and Biomass Composition. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • In 2007, U.S. Congress created the "Energy Independence and Security Act" with primary goals focused on increasing the knowledge in production of renewable fuels, increasing the percentages of renewable fuels in the transportation sector and decreasing the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel sources. To achieve these goals, many species have been pointed as sources of feedstock for the biofuel industry. Photoperiod sensitive (PS) biomass sorghum for the lignocellusosic based conversion is one. In this study, three main objectives were addressed regarding the relative performance for biomass yield and biomass composition of PS biomass sorghum. First, genetic and environmental variation effects on the biomass yield and biomass composition, and usefulness of pre-classification of genotypes by biomass lignin content were evaluated. On the set of genotypes and locations tested, the environmental effect had the largest influence on the biomass composition, yield and its components. Although smaller, the genetic variation effect was significant for most of the traits, some traits had significant genotype by environment GXE interaction. The pre-classification of genotypes according to lignin content proved to be an efficient system of separating genotypes as groups, but failed to be efficient in separating on the entries bases. Assessment of growth patterns for biomass yield and composition, characterized photoperiod sensitive sorghum as capable of producing a harvestable crop as soon as 4 months, but variations in the concentration of constituents and moisture percentage, pointed to a harvest window that can be extended up to the 7th month after planting. Genetic variation was observed in this trail for most agronomic and composition traits, but a strong environmental effect was also observed. Lastly, the influence of three diverse cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) systems in biomass sorghum hybrids was assessed. The presence of A1, A2 or A3 CMS in the hybrids tested in this study had no influence on the biomass yield performance or in the biomass composition. Therefore, any of the CMS systems can be used in the production of biomass sorghum hybrid seed. Also, in this trial the environmental effects were significant and strong for most traits evaluated.
  • In 2007, U.S. Congress created the "Energy Independence and Security Act" with primary goals focused on increasing the knowledge in production of renewable fuels, increasing the percentages of renewable fuels in the transportation sector and decreasing the emissions of greenhouse gases from fossil fuel sources. To achieve these goals, many species have been pointed as sources of feedstock for the biofuel industry. Photoperiod sensitive (PS) biomass sorghum for the lignocellusosic based conversion is one. In this study, three main objectives were addressed regarding the relative performance for biomass yield and biomass composition of PS biomass sorghum.

    First, genetic and environmental variation effects on the biomass yield and biomass composition, and usefulness of pre-classification of genotypes by biomass lignin content were evaluated. On the set of genotypes and locations tested, the environmental effect had the largest influence on the biomass composition, yield and its components. Although smaller, the genetic variation effect was significant for most of the traits, some traits had significant genotype by environment GXE interaction. The pre-classification of genotypes according to lignin content proved to be an efficient system of separating genotypes as groups, but failed to be efficient in separating on the entries bases.

    Assessment of growth patterns for biomass yield and composition, characterized photoperiod sensitive sorghum as capable of producing a harvestable crop as soon as 4 months, but variations in the concentration of constituents and moisture percentage, pointed to a harvest window that can be extended up to the 7th month after planting. Genetic variation was observed in this trail for most agronomic and composition traits, but a strong environmental effect was also observed.

    Lastly, the influence of three diverse cytoplasm male sterility (CMS) systems in biomass sorghum hybrids was assessed. The presence of A1, A2 or A3 CMS in the hybrids tested in this study had no influence on the biomass yield performance or in the biomass composition. Therefore, any of the CMS systems can be used in the production of biomass sorghum hybrid seed. Also, in this trial the environmental effects were significant and strong for most traits evaluated.

publication date

  • August 2012