Depressive symptomology management and falls among middle aged and older adults Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: This study aims to examine the relationship between middle-aged and older adults' depressive symptomology and anti-depressant use and the frequency of falls within the previous 12 months, controlling for sociodemographic variables, health indicators, and health behaviors. METHOD: From the 2010 National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project, 2338 cases were examined. Falls were categorized into a binary variable, comparing zero falls with one or more falls. An unadjusted model was run to examine the relationship between independent and dependent variables. Potential covariates were added into the model, and backward elimination was used among independent variables with a univariate P < 0.05 to identify the covariates with the strongest association with falls. This final adjusted binary logistic regression model was then used to examine the relationship between falls and the independent variables. RESULTS: In the adjusted model, anti-depressant use was positively associated with falls (P = 0.001), as was being female (P < 0.001), having diabetes (P = 0.018), and having increased limitations in daily activities (P < 0.001). The relationship between depressive symptomology and anti-depressant prescription was also significantly associated with falls (P = 0.006). CONCLUSION: While findings confirm that a relationship between depressive symptomology and anti-depressant use are associated with falls among middle-aged and older adults, additional studies are needed that simultaneously examine the influence of these two risk factors.

author list (cited authors)

  • Prizer, L. P., Smith, M. L., Housman, J., & Ory, M. G.

citation count

  • 6

publication date

  • March 2015