Urinary trichlorophenol levels and increased risk of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder among US school-aged children Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Trichlorophenols (TCPs) are organochlorine compounds which are ubiquitous in the environment and well known for their carcinogenic effects. However, little is known about their neurotoxicity in humans. OBJECTIVES: Our goal was to examine the association between body burden of TCPs (ie, 2,4,5-TCP and 2,4,6-TCP) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). METHODS: We calculated ORs and 95% CIs from logistic regression analyses using data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to evaluate the association between urinary TCPs and parent-reported ADHD among 2546 children aged 6-15 years. RESULTS: Children with low levels (<3.58 μg/g) and high levels (≥3.58 μg/g) of urinary 2,4,6-TCP had a higher risk of parent-reported ADHD compared to children with levels below the limit of detection (OR 1.54, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.43 and OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.66, respectively; p for trend=0.006) after adjusting for covariates. No association was found between urinary 2,4,5-TCP and parent-reported ADHD. CONCLUSION: Exposure to TCP may increase the risk of behavioural impairment in children. The potential neurotoxicity of these chemicals should be considered in public health efforts to reduce environmental exposures/contamination, especially in countries where organochlorine pesticides are still commonly used.

altmetric score

  • 4.25

author list (cited authors)

  • Xu, X., Nembhard, W. N., Kan, H., Kearney, G., Zhang, Z., & Talbott, E. O.

citation count

  • 18

publication date

  • May 2011

publisher

  • BMJ  Publisher