Genetic-diet interactions in the Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis syndrome in quarter horses fed varying amounts of potassium: IV. Pre-cecal and post-ileal absorption of potassium and sodium Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • During an experiment to determine the genetic-diet interactions in genetically predisposed Quarter Horses, biphasic symptoms of Hyperkalemic Periodic Paralysis (HYPP) were observed when the HYPP H/N broodmares were fed the higher potassium rations. 1 The cause of those symptoms was assumed to be: 1) the difference in absorption times of the highly absorbable potassium citrate in the concentrates and the potassium contained in the cells of the grains and hays in the rest of the rations, 2) partial absorption of potassium in the small intestine followed by no absorption from the cecum and further absorption in the large colon or 3) a combination of both of the above explanations. Since previously cannulated ponies were available in this laboratory, an experiment was designed to determine which of those possibilities was the most likely. Three ponies, weighing an average of 132 kg, with posterior-ileal cannulas were used in a 3x3 Latin square experiment to determine the amounts of potassium and sodium that would be absorbed pre-cecally and post-ilealy. The ponies were fed the same rations as the mares in the previously described experiment (see part I), which provided approximately 1.1, 1.9 and 2.9% potassium by weight as fed. Samples of water, feces, ileal contents and blood were collected. Water, feed, ileal and fecal samples were analyzed for sodium and potassium concentration. Apparent absorption of potassium prior to the cecum was 97% when the ponies were fed the low potassium diet and 98% when they were fed the higher potassium diets. Three percent and 2% of the potassium was absorbed from the hindgut when the ponies were fed the low potassium diet and the higher potassium diets, respectively. Nine percent and 16% of sodium was absorbed pre-cecally when the ponies were fed the low potassium diet and the higher potassium diets, respectively. Ninety-one and 84% of the sodium was absorbed from the hindgut, when the ponies were fed the low potassium diet and the higher potassium diets, respectively for 99-100% total absorption of both sodium and potassium from all diets. These results indicate that the potassium from the three diets was absorbed pre-cecally, and that the process took up to nine hours, resulting in bi-phasic HYPP symptoms in the HYPP H/N mares in the companion experiment. This information can be used to better understand the relationship between dietary potassium, plasma K+ concentration and HYPP symptoms.

author list (cited authors)

  • Reynolds, J. A., Potter, G. D., Greene, L. W., Wu, G., Carter, G. K., Martin, M. T., ... Erkert, R. S.

citation count

  • 0

publication date

  • December 1998