Sivon, Andrew Garret (2018-05). Developing Guidelines for the Selection of Appropriate Fracture Models in the Numerical Simulation of Ultra-Low Permeability Reservoirs. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • The prediction of production from stimulated ultra-low permeability (ULP) media using numerical simulation is thought to be highly correlated with the type of fracture model used in the simulator. Although there are some general rules about the applicability of these fracture models, there are no guidelines for the a-priori selection of the "most appropriate" model. In general, the selection of the fracture model is a matter of preference and/or familiarity of the person performing the modeling. This work presents modelling cases from the Eagle Ford (TX), Bakken (ND), Three Forks (ND), and Wolfcamp (TX) ULP formations where we compare and contrast fracture models. Production data from wells in the aforementioned formations are history-matched using models commonly available in commercial reservoir simulation programs. A hybrid simulation model consisting of a symmetry element which represents a single perforation cluster and accompanying induced fracture network is created. This network consists of a discrete hydraulic fracture in a media of one of the four following models to represent the reservoir and a possible stimulated reservoir volume (SRV): ? The equivalent continuum model (ECM) ? The dual porosity model (DP) ? The dual permeability model (DK) ? The multiple interactive continuum model (MINC) The "most representative" models are selected based on the history-matched data associated with a given case -- and specifically, the physical dimension/relevance of the parameters that were matched. On a regional level, recommendations of particular models that provide the best match or appear to be more "applicable" across a reservoir are made. In addition, we consider and investigate the correlation between the model applicability and the reservoir attributes, the stimulation design, and the completion methods. These results are used to generate a set of guidelines that can form a basis for extending the findings of this work to reservoirs outside of the study.
  • The prediction of production from stimulated ultra-low permeability (ULP) media using
    numerical simulation is thought to be highly correlated with the type of fracture model
    used in the simulator. Although there are some general rules about the applicability of
    these fracture models, there are no guidelines for the a-priori selection of the "most
    appropriate" model. In general, the selection of the fracture model is a matter of
    preference and/or familiarity of the person performing the modeling. This work presents
    modelling cases from the Eagle Ford (TX), Bakken (ND), Three Forks (ND), and
    Wolfcamp (TX) ULP formations where we compare and contrast fracture models.
    Production data from wells in the aforementioned formations are history-matched using
    models commonly available in commercial reservoir simulation programs. A hybrid
    simulation model consisting of a symmetry element which represents a single perforation
    cluster and accompanying induced fracture network is created. This network consists of
    a discrete hydraulic fracture in a media of one of the four following models to represent
    the reservoir and a possible stimulated reservoir volume (SRV):
    ? The equivalent continuum model (ECM)
    ? The dual porosity model (DP)
    ? The dual permeability model (DK)
    ? The multiple interactive continuum model (MINC)
    The "most representative" models are selected based on the history-matched data
    associated with a given case -- and specifically, the physical dimension/relevance of the
    parameters that were matched. On a regional level, recommendations of particular models
    that provide the best match or appear to be more "applicable" across a reservoir are made.
    In addition, we consider and investigate the correlation between the model applicability
    and the reservoir attributes, the stimulation design, and the completion methods. These
    results are used to generate a set of guidelines that can form a basis for extending the
    findings of this work to reservoirs outside of the study.

publication date

  • May 2018