Algethami, Abdullah Ayedh B (2017-12). Regenerative Suspension System Modeling and Control. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Many energy indicators show an increase in the world's energy deficit. Demand for portable energy sources is growing and has increased the market for energy harvesters and regenerative systems. This work investigated the implementation of a regenerative suspension in a two-degree-of freedom (2-DOF) quarter-car suspension system. First, an active controller was designed and implemented. It showed 69% improvement in rider comfort and consumed 8 - 9 W of power to run the linear motor used in the experiment. A regenerative suspension system was then designed to save the energy normally spent in active suspensions, approximately several kilowatts in an actual car. Regenerative suspension is preferable because it can regenerate energy. Experimental investigations were then conducted to find generator constants and damping coefficients. Additionally, generator damping effects and power regeneration in the quarter-car test bed were also investigated. The experiments showed that a linear regenerative damper can suppress up to 22% of vibrations and harvest 2% of the disturbance power. Since both harvesting and damping capabilities were noticeable in this test bed, it was used to implement regenerative suspension, and a regenerative controller was developed to provide riders with additional comfort. To implement this regenerative controller, an electronic interface was designed to facilitate controlling the regenerative force and storing energy after the rectification process. The electronic interface used was a symmetrical-bridgeless boost converter (SBBC) due to its few components and even fewer control efforts. The converter was then modeled in a manner that made the current and voltage in phase for the maximum power factor. The converter control allowed the motor's external load to be presented as of variable resistance with the unity power factor. The generator was then considered a voltage source for energy regeneration purposes. The controller was designed to control regenerative force at a frequency of 20 kHz. This frequency was sufficient to enable another controller to manipulate the desired regenerative damping force, which was chosen to be 1 kHz. The input to this controller was the generator voltage used to determine the polarity of pulse-width modulation (PWM). Therefore, a combination of converter and controller was able to take the place of an active controller. A different controller was then designed to manipulate the desired damping force. This regenerative controller was designed in a manner similar to that of a semi-active controller. It improved vibration suppression and enhanced harvesting capabilities. The regenerative suspension showed better results than a passive suspension. The improvements are minimal at this time, but there is the potential for greater improvement with a more efficient controller. The harvested energy was so small in this experiment because the damper was inefficient. In practice, the damper's efficiency should be improved. A regenerative damper will be more economical than a passive damper, and suppress more vibration at the same time. The active suspension system showed superior performance. Conversely, the regenerative system showed only modest performance but also regenerated energy. However, a regenerative suspension can be combined with an active suspension to enhance the rider's comfort and provide energy regeneration.
  • Many energy indicators show an increase in the world's energy deficit. Demand for portable energy sources is growing and has increased the market for energy harvesters and regenerative systems. This work investigated the implementation of a regenerative suspension in a two-degree-of freedom (2-DOF) quarter-car suspension system. First, an active controller was designed and implemented. It showed 69% improvement in rider comfort and consumed 8 - 9 W of power to run the linear motor used in the experiment. A regenerative suspension system was then designed to save the energy normally spent in active suspensions, approximately several kilowatts in an actual car. Regenerative suspension is preferable because it can regenerate energy. Experimental investigations were then conducted to find generator constants and damping coefficients. Additionally, generator damping effects and power regeneration in the quarter-car test bed were also investigated. The experiments showed that a linear regenerative damper can suppress up to 22% of vibrations and harvest 2% of the disturbance power. Since both harvesting and damping capabilities were noticeable in this test bed, it was used to implement regenerative suspension, and a regenerative controller was developed to provide riders with additional comfort.

    To implement this regenerative controller, an electronic interface was designed to facilitate controlling the regenerative force and storing energy after the rectification process. The electronic interface used was a symmetrical-bridgeless boost converter (SBBC) due to its few components and even fewer control efforts. The converter was then modeled in a manner that made the current and voltage in phase for the maximum power factor. The converter control allowed the motor's external load to be presented as of variable resistance with the unity power factor. The generator was then considered a voltage source for energy regeneration purposes.

    The controller was designed to control regenerative force at a frequency of 20 kHz. This frequency was sufficient to enable another controller to manipulate the desired regenerative damping force, which was chosen to be 1 kHz. The input to this controller was the generator voltage used to determine the polarity of pulse-width modulation (PWM). Therefore, a combination of converter and controller was able to take the place of an active controller. A different controller was then designed to manipulate the desired damping force.

    This regenerative controller was designed in a manner similar to that of a semi-active controller. It improved vibration suppression and enhanced harvesting capabilities. The regenerative suspension showed better results than a passive suspension. The improvements are minimal at this time, but there is the potential for greater improvement with a more efficient controller. The harvested energy was so small in this experiment because the damper was inefficient. In practice, the damper's efficiency should be improved. A regenerative damper will be more economical than a passive damper, and suppress more vibration at the same time. The active suspension system showed superior performance. Conversely, the regenerative system showed only modest performance but also regenerated energy. However, a regenerative suspension can be combined with an active suspension to enhance the rider's comfort and provide energy regeneration.

publication date

  • December 2017