Risk factors for history of previous colic and for chronic, intermittent colic in a population of horses. Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To identify risk factors for recurrent colic and chronic, intermittent colic in horses. DESIGN: Case control study. ANIMALS: The population included 768 horses examined by veterinarians for emergencies other than colic (control group). PROCEDURE: Horses with colic that had history of colic (n = 232) were compared with those without such history (n = 536), using logistic regression analysis to identify risk factors for history of previous colic and to determine odds ratios (OR) for these associations. Among the 232 horses in the history of colic group, 58 horses that had chronic, intermittent colic were compared with the no history of colic group and the control group to identify factors associated with chronic, intermittent colic, using multiple logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Among horses with colic, factors significantly associated with history of colic by multiple logistic regression analysis included history of abdominal surgery (OR = 3.1; P < 0.0001), age > 8 years (OR = 1.5; P < 0.0001), feeding of coastal grass hay (OR = 1.34; P 0.012), Arabian bread (OR = 1.28; P = 0.044), and recent change in stabling (OR = 0.76, P = 0.024). Among horses with colic, factors significantly associated with chronic, intermittent colic were history of previous abdominal surgery (OR = 2.2; P = 0.021), age > 8 years (OR = 2.0; P < 0.0001), being a gelding (OR = 1.7 with female as the reference population; P = 0.002), feeding of coastal grass hay (OR = 1.6; P = 0.045), and farm density < 0.5 horses/acre (OR = 1.6; P = 0.003). When the CIC group was compared with the control group, significant risk factors included history of abdominal surgery (OR = 270.7; P < 0.0001), age > 8 years (OR = 2.4; P < 0.0001), recent change in diet (OR = 2.1; P = 0.005), farm density < 0.5 horses/acre (OR = 2.0; P = 0.0001); being a gelding (OR = 1.8, with female as the reference population; P = 0.002), and Arabian breed (OR = 1.6; P = 0.050). CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Certain findings of signalment and management factors may identify horses at increased risk of recurrent forms of colic.

author list (cited authors)

  • Cohen, N. D., & Peloso, J. G.

citation count

  • 61

publication date

  • March 1996