Incorporation of a Dietary Omega 3 Fatty Acid Impairs Murine Macrophage Responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Beside their health benefits, dietary omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) might impair host resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) by creating an immunosuppressive environment. We hypothesized that incorporation of n-3 PUFA suppresses activation of macrophage antimycobacterial responses and favors bacterial growth, in part, by modulating the IFNgamma-mediated signaling pathway. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Murine macrophage-like J774A.1 cells were incubated with bovine serum albumin (BSA)-conjugated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3) or BSA alone, activated with recombinant IFNgamma, and infected with a virulent strain (H37Rv) of M. tuberculosis. The fatty acid composition of macrophage membranes was modified significantly by DHA treatment. DHA-treated macrophages were less effective in controlling intracellular mycobacteria and showed impaired oxidative metabolism and reduced phagolysosome maturation. Incorporation of DHA resulted in defective macrophage activation, as characterized by reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNFalpha, IL-6 and MCP-1), and lower expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86). DHA treatment impaired STAT1 phosphorylation and colocalization of the IFNgamma receptor with lipid rafts, without affecting surface expression of IFNgamma receptor. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that DHA reduces the ability of J774A.1 cells to control M. tuberculosis in response to activation by IFNgamma, by modulation of IFNgamma receptor signaling and function, suggesting that n-3 PUFA-enriched diets may have a detrimental effect on host immunity to tuberculosis.

author list (cited authors)

  • Bonilla, D. L., Ly, L. H., Fan, Y., Chapkin, R. S., & McMurray, D. N.

citation count

  • 32

publication date

  • May 2010