Kolev, Tzanio Valentinov (2004-08). Least-squares methods for computational electromagnetics. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • The modeling of electromagnetic phenomena described by the Maxwell's equations is of critical importance in many practical applications. The numerical simulation of these equations is challenging and much more involved than initially believed. Consequently, many discretization techniques, most of them quite complicated, have been proposed. In this dissertation, we present and analyze a new methodology for approximation of the time-harmonic Maxwell's equations. It is an extension of the negative-norm least-squares finite element approach which has been applied successfully to a variety of other problems. The main advantages of our method are that it uses simple, piecewise polynomial, finite element spaces, while giving quasi-optimal approximation, even for solutions with low regularity (such as the ones found in practical applications). The numerical solution can be efficiently computed using standard and well-known tools, such as iterative methods and eigensolvers for symmetric and positive definite systems (e.g. PCG and LOBPCG) and reconditioners for second-order problems (e.g. Multigrid). Additionally, approximation of varying polynomial degrees is allowed and spurious eigenmodes are provably avoided. We consider the following problems related to the Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain: the magnetostatic problem, the electrostatic problem, the eigenvalue problem and the full time-harmonic system. For each of these problems, we present a natural (very) weak variational formulation assuming minimal regularity of the solution. In each case, we prove error estimates for the approximation with two different discrete least-squares methods. We also show how to deal with problems posed on domains that are multiply connected or have multiple boundary components. Besides the theoretical analysis of the methods, the dissertation provides various numerical results in two and three dimensions that illustrate and support the theory.
  • The modeling of electromagnetic phenomena described by the Maxwell's equations is of critical importance in many practical
    applications. The numerical simulation of these equations is challenging and much more involved than initially believed. Consequently, many discretization techniques, most of them quite complicated, have been proposed.

    In this dissertation, we present and analyze a new methodology for approximation of the time-harmonic Maxwell's equations. It is an extension of the negative-norm least-squares finite element approach which has been applied successfully to a variety of other problems.

    The main advantages of our method are that it uses simple, piecewise polynomial, finite element spaces, while giving quasi-optimal approximation, even for solutions with low
    regularity (such as the ones found in practical applications). The numerical solution can be efficiently computed using standard and well-known tools, such as iterative methods
    and eigensolvers for symmetric and positive definite
    systems (e.g. PCG and LOBPCG) and reconditioners for second-order problems (e.g. Multigrid).
    Additionally, approximation of varying polynomial degrees is allowed and spurious eigenmodes are provably avoided.

    We consider the following problems related to the Maxwell's equations in the frequency domain: the magnetostatic problem, the electrostatic problem, the eigenvalue problem and the full time-harmonic system. For each of these problems, we present a natural (very) weak
    variational formulation assuming minimal regularity of the solution. In each case, we prove error estimates for the approximation
    with two different discrete least-squares methods. We also show how to deal with problems posed on domains that are multiply connected or have multiple boundary components.

    Besides the theoretical analysis of the methods, the dissertation provides various numerical results in two and three dimensions
    that illustrate and support the theory.

publication date

  • August 2004