Baker, Sean Travis (2013-05). Mechanical Assessment of Veterinary Orthopedic Implant Technologies: Comparative Studies of Canine Fracture Fixation and Equine Arthrodesis Devices and Techniques. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • The Clamp-Rod Internal Fixator (CRIF) is a fracture fixation implant with growing popularity among veterinarian's for its versatility and ease of use. Although the CRIF is currently in clinical use, relatively few reports exist describing the biomechanical properties and clinical results of this system. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro biomechanical properties of a 5mm CRIF/rod construct to a 3.5mm Limited Contact-Dynamic Compression Plate (LC-DCP/rod) construct using a canine femoral gap model. Paired canine femora were treated with 40mm mid-diaphyseal ostectomies and randomly assigned to CRIF/rod or LC-DCP/rod. Five pairs of constructs were tested in bending and five pairs were evaluated in torsion. Single ramp to failure tests were conducted to evaluate construct stiffness, yield load, and failure mode. While CRIF/rod and LC-DCP/rod were not significantly different when evaluated in bending, LC-DCP/rod constructs are significantly more rigid than CRIF/rod constructs at higher torsional loads. Below 10degrees of twist, or 4.92Nm torque, the LC-DCP/rod and CRIF/rod were not statistically different in torsion. Catastrophic injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint resulting in the disruption of the suspensory apparatus are the most common fatal injuries in thoroughbred racehorses. Fetlock arthrodesis is a procedure designed to mitigate suffering from injury as well as degenerative diseases affecting articulation. The objective of this study is to assess the in vitro biomechanical behavior of techniques for fetlock arthrodesis. Twelve forelimb pairs were collected from adult horses euthanized for reasons unrelated to disease of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP). A 14-16-hole broad 4.5mm Locking Compression Plate (LCP) was compared to a 14-16 hole broad Dynamic Compression Plate (DCP). Both constructs used a two "figure-eight" 1.25mm stainless steel wire tension band. Fatigue tests and to failure tests were conducted. There were no significant differences in stiffness between groups for fatigue tests. Stiffness increased after the first fatigue cycle for the LCP/wire (80.56+/-52.22%) and DCP/wire (56.58+/-14.85%). Above 3.5mm of axial deformation there was a statistical difference between the stiffness of the LCP/wire (3824.12+/-751.84 N/mm) and the DCP/wire (3009.65+/-718.25 N/mm) (P=0.038). The LCP/wire showed increased stiffness above 3.5mm compression compared to the DCP/wire. Under fatigue testing conditions the constructs are not statistically different.
  • The Clamp-Rod Internal Fixator (CRIF) is a fracture fixation implant with growing popularity among veterinarian's for its versatility and ease of use. Although the CRIF is currently in clinical use, relatively few reports exist describing the biomechanical properties and clinical results of this system. The objective of this study was to determine the in vitro biomechanical properties of a 5mm CRIF/rod construct to a 3.5mm Limited Contact-Dynamic Compression Plate (LC-DCP/rod) construct using a canine femoral gap model.

    Paired canine femora were treated with 40mm mid-diaphyseal ostectomies and randomly assigned to CRIF/rod or LC-DCP/rod. Five pairs of constructs were tested in bending and five pairs were evaluated in torsion. Single ramp to failure tests were conducted to evaluate construct stiffness, yield load, and failure mode.

    While CRIF/rod and LC-DCP/rod were not significantly different when evaluated in bending, LC-DCP/rod constructs are significantly more rigid than CRIF/rod constructs at higher torsional loads. Below 10degrees of twist, or 4.92Nm torque, the LC-DCP/rod and CRIF/rod were not statistically different in torsion.

    Catastrophic injuries of the metacarpophalangeal joint resulting in the disruption of the suspensory apparatus are the most common fatal injuries in thoroughbred racehorses. Fetlock arthrodesis is a procedure designed to mitigate suffering from injury as well as degenerative diseases affecting articulation. The objective of this study is to assess the in vitro biomechanical behavior of techniques for fetlock arthrodesis.

    Twelve forelimb pairs were collected from adult horses euthanized for reasons unrelated to disease of the metacarpophalangeal joint (MCP). A 14-16-hole broad 4.5mm Locking Compression Plate (LCP) was compared to a 14-16 hole broad Dynamic Compression Plate (DCP). Both constructs used a two "figure-eight" 1.25mm stainless steel wire tension band. Fatigue tests and to failure tests were conducted.

    There were no significant differences in stiffness between groups for fatigue tests. Stiffness increased after the first fatigue cycle for the LCP/wire (80.56+/-52.22%) and DCP/wire (56.58+/-14.85%). Above 3.5mm of axial deformation there was a statistical difference between the stiffness of the LCP/wire (3824.12+/-751.84 N/mm) and the DCP/wire (3009.65+/-718.25 N/mm) (P=0.038).

    The LCP/wire showed increased stiffness above 3.5mm compression compared to the DCP/wire. Under fatigue testing conditions the constructs are not statistically different.

publication date

  • May 2013