"Personal road map for recovery:" examining the therapeutic use of weblogs by stroke survivors with aphasia. Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Strokes are a leading cause of disability in the United States. Approximately 25-40% of individuals who experience a stroke will have aphasia. Individuals with aphasia experience many life changes and some have found that writing activities, such as publishing text entries on a personal website, or weblog, to be therapeutic. PURPOSE: This study aimed to gain a greater understanding of the therapeutic use of blogs for stroke survivors with aphasia. DESIGN: Inductive qualitative content analysis. METHODS: Potential, publicly available weblogs written by people with aphasia were identified using a pre-determined search method and five met inclusion criteria. Data were collected from websites and collated into 453 pages of narratives. An inductive qualitative content analysis process was used to extract codes that were reduced to sub-categories and generic categories. RESULTS: A main category of therapeutic healing and three generic categories of (1) living with aphasia, (2) accepting a new identity, and (3) creating a community were identified. CONCLUSION: Weblog writing was therapeutic for stroke survivors with aphasia. Authors reported benefits across cognitive, psychological, emotional, and social domains. Health professionals should consider recommending weblog writing, journaling, or other methods of writing for stroke survivors with aphasia.Implications for rehabilitationCreating illness weblog posts can be therapeutically beneficial for stroke survivors with aphasia as a tool that addresses psychological, emotional, and social aspects in their recovery.Blogging appeared to offer a medium for stroke survivors with aphasia to practice writing, to express what living with aphasia is like, to explore changes in their post-stroke identities, and to create a community with others.Health professionals should consider recommending weblog writing, journaling, or other methods of writing for stroke survivors with aphasia.

published proceedings

  • Disabil Rehabil

author list (cited authors)

  • Carcello, K., & McLennon, S.

complete list of authors

  • Carcello, Karen||McLennon, Susan

publication date

  • January 1, 2022 11:11 AM