Effects of dietary starch and lipid levels on the protein retention and growth of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Protein accretion in some fish species is affected by dietary lipids, starch and their interactions, but this aspect of nutrition is largely unknown in largemouth bass (LMB). Therefore, we designed six experimental diets with three starch levels (5%, 10%, and 15%; dry matter  basis) and two lipid levels (10% and 12.5%; dry matter basis) to evaluate the effects of dietary starch and lipid levels on the protein retention, growth, feed utilization, and liver histology of LMB. There were three tanks (18 fish per tank, ~ 4.85 g per fish) per dietary treatment group and the trial lasted for 8 weeks. Fish were fed to apparent satiation twice daily. Results indicated that increasing the dietary starch level from 5 to 15% reduced (P < 0.05) absolute feed intake (AFI; - 9.0%, - 15% and - 14% on days 14-28, 28-42, and 42-56, respectively) and weight gains (- 4.4% and - 6.5% on days 42 and 56, respectively) of LMB. Increasing the dietary lipid level from 10 to 12.5% reduced (P < 0.05) AFI (- 9.7%, - 11.7% and - 11.9% on days 14-28, 28-42; and 42-56, respectively), weight gains (- 4.2%, - 5.9% and - 6.9% on days 28, 42 and 56, respectively), and survival rate (by a 5.6% unit) of LMB. The retention of dietary protein and some amino acids in the body was affected by dietary starch or lipid levels and their interactions. The viscerosomatic index (VSI), hepatosomatic index (HSI), and intraperitoneal fat ratio (IPFR) increased with increasing the dietary starch level from 5 to 15%. Compared with 10% lipids, 12.5% lipids in diets increased IPFR but had no effect on VSI or HSI. The concentrations of glucose in serum increased with increasing the dietary starch level from 5 to 15% at 4 to 24 h after feeding, with the effect of dietary lipids being time-dependent. Compared with a 5%-starch diet, fish fed a diet with 10%- or 15%-starch exhibited an enlarged and pale liver with excessive glycogen. Based on these findings, we recommend dietary lipid and starch levels to be 10% and < 10%, respectively, for juvenile LMB to maximize the retention of dietary protein in their bodies.

author list (cited authors)

  • Li, X., Zheng, S., Ma, X., Cheng, K., & Wu, G.

publication date

  • January 1, 2020 11:11 AM