Dingle, Brent Michael (2003-05). Volumetric particle modeling. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This dissertation presents a robust method of modeling objects and forces for computer animation. Within this method objects and forces are represented as particles. As in most modeling systems, the movement of objects is driven by physically based forces. The usage of particles, however, allows more artistically motivated behavior to be achieved and also allows the modeling of heterogeneous objects and objects in different state phases: solid, liquid or gas. By using invisible particles to propagate forces through the modeling environment complex behavior is achieved through the interaction of relatively simple components. In sum, 'macroscopic' behavior emerges from 'microscopic' modeling. We present a newly developed modeling framework expanding on related work. This framework allows objects and forces to be modeled using particle representations and provides the details on how objects are created, how they interact, and how they may be displayed. We present examples to demonstrate the viability and robustness of the developed method of modeling. They illustrate the breaking and fracturing of solids, the interaction of objects in different phase states, and the achievement of a reasonable balance between artistic and physically based behaviors.
  • This dissertation presents a robust method of modeling objects and forces for computer animation. Within
    this method objects and forces are represented as particles. As in most modeling systems, the movement of
    objects is driven by physically based forces. The usage of particles, however, allows more artistically
    motivated behavior to be achieved and also allows the modeling of heterogeneous objects and objects in
    different state phases: solid, liquid or gas. By using invisible particles to propagate forces through the
    modeling environment complex behavior is achieved through the interaction of relatively simple
    components. In sum, 'macroscopic' behavior emerges from 'microscopic' modeling.
    We present a newly developed modeling framework expanding on related work. This framework allows
    objects and forces to be modeled using particle representations and provides the details on how objects are
    created, how they interact, and how they may be displayed. We present examples to demonstrate the
    viability and robustness of the developed method of modeling. They illustrate the breaking and fracturing
    of solids, the interaction of objects in different phase states, and the achievement of a reasonable balance
    between artistic and physically based behaviors.

publication date

  • May 2003