Racial, Rural, and Regional Disparities in Diabetes-Related Lower-Extremity Amputation Rates, 2009-2017. Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To examine the racial/ethnic, rural-urban, and regional variations in the trends of diabetes-related lower-extremity amputations (LEAs) among hospitalized U.S. adults from 2009 to 2017. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) (2009-2017) to identify trends in LEA rates among those primarily hospitalized for diabetes in the U.S. We conducted multivariable logistic regressions to identify individuals at risk for LEA based on race/ethnicity, census region location (North, Midwest, South, and West), and rurality of residence. RESULTS: From 2009 to 2017, the rates of minor LEAs increased across all racial/ethnic, rural/urban, and census region categories. The increase in minor LEAs was driven by Native Americans (annual percent change [APC] 7.1%, P < 0.001) and Asians/Pacific Islanders (APC 7.8%, P < 0.001). Residents of non-core (APC 5.4%, P < 0.001) and large central metropolitan areas (APC 5.5%, P < 0.001) experienced the highest increases over time in minor LEA rates. Among Whites and residents of the Midwest and non-core and small metropolitan areas there was a significant increase in major LEAs. Regression findings showed that Native Americans and Hispanics were more likely to have a minor or major LEA compared with Whites. The odds of a major LEA increased with rurality and was also higher among residents of the South than among those of the Northeast. A steep decline in major-to-minor amputation ratios was observed, especially among Native Americans. CONCLUSIONS: Despite increased risk of diabetes-related lower-limb amputations in underserved groups, our findings are promising when the major-to-minor amputation ratio is considered.

author list (cited authors)

  • Akinlotan, M. A., Primm, K., Bolin, J. N., Ferdinand Cheres, A. L., Lee, J., Callaghan, T., & Ferdinand, A. O.

publication date

  • January 1, 2021 11:11 AM