Self‐Perceptions, Normative Beliefs, and Substance Use Associated With High School Girls Comparing Themselves to Peers Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: We assessed whether self-descriptions, self-perceptions, perceived substance use of friends, and actual substance use were associated with high school girls' frequency of making social comparisons to peers. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey data for 357 high school girls using multinomial logistic regression. RESULTS: Compared to those who "never/rarely" made social comparisons, participants who self-described as fearing something constantly (p = .014) and forced to imitate the people they like (p = .009) were more likely to "usually" compare themselves to peers. Participants who described themselves as feeling forced to imitate the people they like (p = .022), were not the person they would like to be (p = .005), and did not remain calm under pressure (p = .010), were more likely to "often/always" make social comparisons. Participants who perceived themselves as unattractive (p = .034) and self-centered (p = .016) were more likely to "often/always" make social comparisons. Participants who perceived a larger proportion of friends use illicit drugs were less likely to "usually" make social comparisons (p = .027). Participants who perceived a larger proportion of friends drink alcohol were more likely to "often/always" make social comparisons (p = .018). CONCLUSIONS: Girls who perceive and describe themselves more negatively are at increased odds of making social comparisons to peers.

altmetric score

  • 0.5

author list (cited authors)

  • Merianos, A. L., Mahabee‐Gittens, E. M., Jacobs, W., Oloruntoba, O., Barry, A. E., & Smith, M. L.

citation count

  • 0

publication date

  • March 2021

publisher