The political incentive explanation of “democratic peace”: Evidence from experimental research Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • In this paper, we summarize a series of experimental studies that show that democracies don’t fight each other because their leaders have very few political incentives to do so. The use of force against other democracies is perceived by the public and by leaders of democratic states as a failure of foreign policy. The reliance of democratic leaders on public support decreases therefore the likelihood of the use of force against other democracies. © 1993, Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. All rights reserved.

author list (cited authors)

  • Geva, N., DeRouen, K. R., & Mintz, A.

citation count

  • 29

publication date

  • February 1993