OCCUPATIONAL SEX INEQUALITY IN THE NONMETROPOLITAN SOUTH, 1960-1980 Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • We investigate structural determinants of occupational differences between white men and women by examining variation in measures of segregation and inequality for a sample of Southern nonmetropolitan areas. The independent variables considered include unemployment rates, community growth, size of community, degree of urbanization, female representation in the labor force, black representation in the labor force, manufacturing concentration, proximity to a metropolitan area, and the structural propensities for segregation and inequality implied by the local occupational structure. The models advanced explain substantial portions of the variation in occupational sex segregation and inequality across areas and have a number of implications for theories of sex differences in occupation. One of the more important findings is that the structural independent variables have very different effects on segregation and inequality. This indicates that inequality and segregation are empirically, as well as conceptually, distinct and that theories of segregation and inequality should be refined to take account of these differences. -Authors

author list (cited authors)

  • STAFFORD, M. T., & FOSSETT, M. A.

publication date

  • January 1989