Rendon Santiago, Tania (2017-08). Caregivers of Individuals with Intellectual Disability: An Examination of the Dynamic Process Model of Caregiver Well-Being. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Through the years, scholars have made various developments in the area of caregiver research. As a result, policy makers and program developers have been able to better assist individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and their families. Additionally, convoluted caregiving concepts have been examined in an array of contexts and populations. Contextual models are vital in understanding the complex and dynamic experiences of caregivers. Although research has shown that some caretakers experience caregiver burden, other findings indicate that caregivers adapt well to their caregiving role. The purpose of the current study was to examine caregiver well-being through the dynamic process model of well-being. In contrast with previous work, this study examined constructs that have not yet been studied within caregiving models. More explicitly, the elements of our model consisted of caregiver positive supports, presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, meaning in caregiving, and aggression exhibited towards caregivers. Outcome variables included physical and mental health composite scores that were used to measure well-being. Furthermore, our model was tested with a sample predominately consisting of Latino caregivers, which is a population that has received little attention in this line of research. It was hypothesized that presence of meaning, search for meaning and meaning in caregiving would serve as mediating factors to caregiver well-being. Results showed that our meaning variables did not function as mediating factors for caregiver well-being. Although our data did not support our hypotheses, it was found that search for meaning contributed negatively to caregiver mental health scores, and that caregivers who experienced aggression from care recipients reported lower levels of meaning in caregiving. Lastly, our findings echoed previous findings indicating that positive support systems had a positive impact on caregiver well-being. The majority of our participants were Latinos; therefore, ethno-multicultural implications, such as marianismo, familism, and caregiving barriers related to immigration are discussed.
  • Through the years, scholars have made various developments in the area of caregiver research. As a result, policy makers and program developers have been able to better assist individuals with Intellectual Disabilities (ID) and their families. Additionally, convoluted caregiving concepts have been examined in an array of contexts and populations. Contextual models are vital in understanding the complex and dynamic experiences of caregivers. Although research has shown that some caretakers experience caregiver burden, other findings indicate that caregivers adapt well to their caregiving role.

    The purpose of the current study was to examine caregiver well-being through the dynamic process model of well-being. In contrast with previous work, this study examined constructs that have not yet been studied within caregiving models. More explicitly, the elements of our model consisted of caregiver positive supports, presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, meaning in caregiving, and aggression exhibited towards caregivers. Outcome variables included physical and mental health composite scores that were used to measure well-being. Furthermore, our model was tested with a sample predominately consisting of Latino caregivers, which is a population that has received little attention in this line of research. It was hypothesized that presence of meaning, search for meaning and meaning in caregiving would serve as mediating factors to caregiver well-being. Results showed that our meaning variables did not function as mediating factors for caregiver well-being. Although our data did not support our hypotheses, it was found that search for meaning contributed negatively to caregiver mental health scores, and that caregivers who experienced aggression from care recipients reported lower levels of meaning in caregiving. Lastly, our findings echoed previous findings indicating that positive support systems had a positive impact on caregiver well-being. The majority of our participants were Latinos; therefore, ethno-multicultural implications, such as marianismo, familism, and caregiving barriers related to immigration are discussed.

publication date

  • August 2017