Pregnancy per artificial insemination during summer in lactating dairy cows after treatment with aspirin Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Embryonic loss in cattle may be related to a hormonal imbalance resulting in alterations in timing of prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) secretion around the time of maternal recognition of pregnancy. The objective of this study was to examine effects of aspirin (a PGF2α inhibitor) on pregnancy per AI (P/AI), and progesterone (P4), and pregnancy specific protein B (PSPB) concentrations in lactating dairy cows inseminated more than once after parturition. Fourteen days after second or subsequent AI (Day 0 = Day of AI), 556 cows were assigned randomly to aspirin (187.2 g total; n = 277) or control (n = 279) groups. Aspirin was administered orally on Day 14 and 15, and control cows were subjected to sham bolus administration. On Day 25, blood samples were collected from a subset of cows (n = 194) to quantify P4 and PSPB, whereas pregnancy was determined in all cows at 35-42 days post-AI. Maximum daily ambient temperature ranged from 38-41 °C during the experiment. Mean parity, days in milk, and times bred before treatment (TBRD) did not differ between groups. There were no differences in P/AI between treatments (aspirin 21.6 % compared with control 27.5 %). Neither treatment, parity, TBRD, or any two-way interactions with treatment affected concentrations of P4. Moreover, there were no effects (P > 0.50) of treatment, or treatment by TBRD interaction on serum PSPB concentrations. A tendency (P = 0.07) occurred for multiparous cows to have greater serum PSPB concentrations compared with primiparous cows. Mean serum PSPB concentrations tended (P = 0.07) to be greater for second or third TBRD compared to fourth and greater TBRD. These results provide evidence that aspirin administered during periods of heat stress after the second and subsequent AI post-partum during the summer months does not improve P/AI or alter P4 and PSPB in lactating dairy cows.

author list (cited authors)

  • Spencer, J. A., Carnahan, K. G., Shafii, B., Dalton, J., & Ahmadzadeh, A.

citation count

  • 1

publication date

  • January 2020