EFFECT OF SOIL SATURATION ON DEVELOPMENT AND 15N-NITRATE UPTAKE EFFICIENCY OF TWO WARM SEASON GRASSES EMERGING FROM DORMANCY Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Use of effluent on turfgrass is increasing due to population growth and limited water supplies. Because effluent is generated continuously, turf managers may be forced to over-irrigate, leading to soil saturation. Although the nutrients in effluent are readily absorbed by turf, the effects of prolonged soil saturation on uptake are unknown. This research examined the impact of soil saturation on plant development and nitrate uptake of two warm-season turfgrasses emerging from dormancy. Dormant grass/soil cores of hybrid bermudagrass and common centipedegrass were treated to stimulate regrowth, with soil moisture controlled at saturation (~0.36 cm 3 cm -3) or field capacity (0.13 cm 3 cm -3). Soil saturation reduced canopy development in both species, but shoot biomass was affected only in bermudagrass. Nitrate uptake by both species was generally unaffected by soil saturation. While extended periods of soil saturation may alter plant development, they do not impair the ability of these turfgrasses to absorb nitrogen. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

author list (cited authors)

  • Wherley, B., Bowman, D., Shi, W., & Rufty, T.

citation count

  • 2

publication date

  • October 2011