n50084SE Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • This article situates the Syriac Julian Romance in early sixth-century Edessa and sees it as a response to Justinian's attempts to force local non-Chalcedonians into communion with the imperial church. It develops the interrelationship between religious violence and eschatological expectation as key themes used to vilify the reign of Julian and glorify the reign of Jovian. While lamenting imperial violence against Christians, the Romance praises violent acts of Christian resistance in the expectation that a righteous emperor will one day arise to protect the true (non-Chalcedonian) faith. Understanding the Romance's emphasis on resistance and hope of vindication deepens our understanding of ecclesiastical and political developments in sixth-century Syria. 2011 Project MUSE.

published proceedings

  • Journal of Early Christian Studies

author list (cited authors)

  • Schwartz, D. L.

publication date

  • January 1, 2011 11:11 AM