Henry, Julianne Shauna (2014-08). A Transcendental Phenomenological Examination on the Impact of Advising on the Decision to Study Abroad. Master's Thesis. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • Agricultural students are falling behind when it comes to competing in the global marketplace. To help prepare students to compete in the global marketplace, participation in a high-impact experience such as study abroad is recommended. In order to increase high-impact experiences for agricultural students, it is important to understand advisor and peer advisor perspectives. The purpose of this study was to understand departmental advisors' and peer advisors' perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University. Qualitative research methods were used to complete this study. Azjen's Theory of Planned Behavior provided the framework to explore advisors' and peer advisors' perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad. The first phase of the study was a qualitative phenomenological examination of the shared experiences of High-Impact Practice (HIP) Advisors in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University who hold advising roles and participated in a high-impact experience through the college. This study focused on the advisors' perceptions and experience in study abroad. Data were collected through interviews. Departmental culture, personal connections, mass communication, and generating awareness emerged as themes. The results suggest influences such as departmental culture, personal connections, and mass communication influence whether students participated in study abroad. In addition, it became evident that advisors need to be better informed about available resources. The second phase of the study was a transcendental phenomenological exploration of the shared experiences of peer advisors in the Ambassadors and Mentors Study Abroad Program who have participated in study abroad through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, plus their perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad in the college. Data were collected through interviews. Educating peers, personal connections, mass communication, and generating awareness emerged as themes. The results suggest educating peers, personal connections, mass communications, and generating awareness influenced how peer advisors informed students and learned about study abroad in the college.
  • Agricultural students are falling behind when it comes to competing in the global marketplace. To help prepare students to compete in the global marketplace, participation in a high-impact experience such as study abroad is recommended. In order to increase high-impact experiences for agricultural students, it is important to understand advisor and peer advisor perspectives. The purpose of this study was to understand departmental advisors' and peer advisors' perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University. Qualitative research methods were used to complete this study. Azjen's Theory of Planned Behavior provided the framework to explore advisors' and peer advisors' perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad.

    The first phase of the study was a qualitative phenomenological examination of the shared experiences of High-Impact Practice (HIP) Advisors in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University who hold advising roles and participated in a high-impact experience through the college. This study focused on the advisors' perceptions and experience in study abroad. Data were collected through interviews. Departmental culture, personal connections, mass communication, and generating awareness emerged as themes. The results suggest influences such as departmental culture, personal connections, and mass communication influence whether students participated in study abroad. In addition, it became evident that advisors need to be better informed about available resources.

    The second phase of the study was a transcendental phenomenological exploration of the shared experiences of peer advisors in the Ambassadors and Mentors Study Abroad Program who have participated in study abroad through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, plus their perceptions related to a student's intent to study abroad in the college. Data were collected through interviews. Educating peers, personal connections, mass communication, and generating awareness emerged as themes. The results suggest educating peers, personal connections, mass communications, and generating awareness influenced how peer advisors informed students and learned about study abroad in the college.

publication date

  • August 2014