High Glucose and Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein Gene Ablation Differentially Impact Whole Body and Liver Phenotype in High‐Fat Pair‐Fed Mice Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Ad libitum-fed diets high in fat and carbohydrate (especially fructose) induce weight gain, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in humans and animal models. However, interpretation is complicated since ad libitum feeding of such diets induces hyperphagia and upregulates expression of liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP)-a protein intimately involved in fatty acid and glucose regulation of lipid metabolism. Wild-type (WT) and L-fabp gene ablated (LKO) mice were pair-fed either high-fat diet (HFD) or high-fat/high-glucose diet (HFGD) wherein total carbohydrate was maintained constant but the proportion of glucose was increased at the expense of fructose. In LKO mice, the pair-fed HFD increased body weight and lean tissue mass (LTM) but had no effect on fat tissue mass (FTM) or hepatic fatty vacuolation as compared to pair-fed WT counterparts. These LKO mice exhibited upregulation of hepatic proteins in fatty acid uptake and cytosolic transport (caveolin and sterol carrier protein-2), but lower hepatic fatty acid oxidation (decreased serum β-hydroxybutyrate). LKO mice pair-fed HFGD also exhibited increased body weight; however, these mice had increased FTM, not LTM, and increased hepatic fatty vacuolation as compared to pair-fed WT counterparts. These LKO mice also exhibited upregulation of hepatic proteins in fatty acid uptake and cytosolic transport (caveolin and acyl-CoA binding protein, but not sterol carrier protein-2), but there was no change in hepatic fatty acid oxidation (serum β-hydroxybutyrate) as compared to pair-fed WT counterparts.

altmetric score

  • 0.5

author list (cited authors)

  • Martin, G. G., Landrock, D., McIntosh, A. L., Milligan, S., Landrock, K. K., Kier, A. B., Mackie, J., & Schroeder, F.

citation count

  • 0

publication date

  • April 2020

publisher

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