Community-Based Participatory Research: a Family Health History-Based Colorectal Cancer Prevention Program Among Chinese Americans Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Asian Americans are the fastest growing racial/ethnic group in the USA, as this population increased by 72% between 2000 and 2015. Chinese Americans are the largest Asian subgroup, with a high immigrant proportion (63%), a high poverty rate (14%), and a large percentage of low English competency (41%). Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer and cause of cancer death among Chinese Americans. As CRC has a genetic predisposition, family health history (FHH) has been proposed as a preventive tool to stratify CRC risk and guide personalized screening and behavioral modifications. The purpose of this study was to adopt a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach to develop the first culturally and linguistically appropriate FHH-based CRC prevention program for Chinese Americans in Texas. The program development involved five CBPR steps: (1) establishment of partnership and research team, (2) literature review and needs assessment, (3) creation of a theoretical framework of the FHH-based CRC prevention, (4) development a culturally and linguistically appropriate intervention, and (5) program evaluation. Key components of this program included two intervention activities: (1) a culturally and linguistically appropriate FHH-based CRC prevention workshop and (2) a follow-up individualized phone consultation and health insurance enrollment and navigation services (if needed). The pilot study suggested feasibility of the program. This CBPR-grounded, FHH-based CRC prevention project can serve as a model for future cancer prevention programs targeting other types of cancers that also have FHH components.

author list (cited authors)

  • Li, M., Yeh, Y., Sun, H., Chang, B., & Chen, L.

citation count

  • 2

publication date

  • February 2019