Class I transactivator, NLRC5: a central player in the MHC class I pathway and cancer immune surveillance Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II molecules play critical roles in the activation of the adaptive immune system by presenting antigens to CD8+ and CD4+ T cells, respectively. Although it has been well known that CIITA (MHC class II transactivator), an NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich-repeat containing) protein, as a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression, the mechanism of MHC class I gene transactivation was unclear. Recently, another NLR protein, NLRC5 (NLR family, CARD domain-containing 5), was identified as an MHC class I transactivator (CITA). NLRC5 is a critical regulator for the transcriptional activation of MHC class I genes and other genes involved in the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. CITA/NLRC5 plays a crucial role in human cancer immunity through the recruitment and activation of tumor killing CD8+ T cells. Here, we discuss the molecular function and mechanism of CITA/NLRC5 in the MHC class I pathway and its role in cancer.

altmetric score

  • 0.25

author list (cited authors)

  • Vijayan, S., Sidiq, T., Yousuf, S., van den Elsen, P. J., & Kobayashi, K. S.

citation count

  • 12

publication date

  • January 2019