Tobacco quitline outcomes by service type. Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Tobacco use is a burden in terms of mortality, chronic disease, and economic impact. Effective treatments exist to aid tobacco users who are motivated to quit. The South Dakota QuitLine provides coaching to all participants and the option of a cessation product (nicotine replacement therapy [NRT], or the prescription medications, varenicline or bupropion) at no cost. This study describes the types of services requested by South Dakota QuitLine participants and the associated cessation outcomes across service types. METHODS: Data from South Dakota QuitLine enrollees during a four year period (2008 to 2011) were included. Enrollment data (demographics and tobacco use) and outcome evaluation data (30 day point prevalence - abstinence) collected seven months later were accessed (N = 11,603/26,876 enrollees, 43.2 percent response). The frequency of requests for each type of cessation service and associated cessation outcomes are reported. Abstinence at seven months was compared for the different services. RESULTS: Frequencies of cessation services requested were coaching/varenicline (64.6 percent), coaching/bupropion (5 percent), coaching/NRT (22.6 percent), and coaching only (5.4 percent). Overall abstinence at seven months was 47.2 percent. Abstinence rates for service types were the following: coaching/varenicline (49.8 percent), coaching/bupropion (47.3 percent), coaching/NRT (42.9 percent), and coaching only (40.3 percent). Chi-square analysis and confidence interval comparisons identified significantly higher abstinence (p < .05) for varenicline/coaching in comparison to coaching only or coaching/NRT. CONCLUSIONS: All service options available from the South Dakota QuitLine result in cessation rates of 40 percent or greater. Providers should assess tobacco use, advise users to quit, and refer to the South Dakota QuitLine.

author list (cited authors)

  • Kerkvliet, J. L., & Fahrenwald, N. L.

citation count

  • 0

publication date

  • January 2014