Knockdown of spinal cord postsynaptic density protein-95 prevents the development of morphine tolerance in rats Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • The activation of spinal cord N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and subsequent intracellular cascades play a pivotal role in the development of opioid tolerance. Postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), a molecular scaffolding protein, assembles a specific set of signaling proteins around NMDA receptors at neuronal synapses. The current study investigated the possible involvement of PSD-95 in the development of opioid tolerance. Opioid tolerance was induced by intrathecal injection of morphine sulfate (20 microg/10 microl) twice a day for 4 consecutive days. Co-administration of morphine twice daily and PSD-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (50 microg/10 microl) once daily for 4 days not only markedly reduced the PSD-95 expression and its binding to NMDA receptors in spinal cord but also significantly prevented the development of morphine tolerance. In contrast, co-administration of morphine twice daily and PSD-95 missense oligodeoxynucleotide (50 microg/10 microl) once daily for 4 days did not produce these effects. The PSD-95 antisense oligodeoxynucleotide at the doses we used did not affect baseline response to noxious thermal stimulation or locomotor function. The present study indicates that the deficiency of spinal cord PSD-95 attenuates the development of opioid tolerance. These results suggest that PSD-95 might be involved in the central mechanisms of opioid tolerance and provide a possible new target for prevention of development of opioid tolerance.

altmetric score

  • 3

author list (cited authors)

  • Liaw, W., Zhang, B., Tao, F., Yaster, M., Johns, R. A., & Tao, Y.

citation count

  • 18

publication date

  • January 2004