Performance Assessment of Building Infrastructure Impacted by the 2017 Hurricane Harvey in the Port Aransas Region Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • © 2018 American Society of Civil Engineers. The wind, storm surge, and flooding loads due to the 2017 Hurricane Harvey had a detrimental impact on the built infrastructure in coastal communities. This paper presents the lessons learned from damage to the built infrastructure in the Port Aransas region in Texas observed after Hurricane Harvey through reconnaissance and postsurvey data as well as statistical analyses and associated patterns of failure modes. The observations and findings of this study are also compared to empirical evidence from past hurricane-induced damage to buildings. A set of rapid and detailed damage assessment data is developed to focus on damage failure modes, distribution of damage to structural and nonstructural components, as well as repair, occupancy, and functionality status at the time of the inspection. The most common damage modes were identified as damage to roof components (roof shingles), vinyl siding, and interior nonstructural elements. It was also observed that the location of the building in the city and surrounding topography as well as structural age of the infrastructure were important parameters that influenced the response of buildings to hurricane-induced loads. The evidence from the performance of the inspected buildings shows the need for new design alternatives as well as sustainable retrofits for existing buildings such as incorporating heavier nailing schedules for roof sheathing and shingles as well as strengthening the connection of vinyl siding. In general, strengthening the envelope of the building to prevent surge and rainwater intrusion can significantly reduce damage.

altmetric score

  • 3.2

author list (cited authors)

  • Aghababaei, M., Koliou, M., & Paal, S. G.

citation count

  • 8

publication date

  • July 2018