Early landscape performance of 20 field-grown birch genotypes at two locations in Arkansas, U.S. and response to irrigation Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Twenty birch genotypes were planted in the field in April 2002 to evaluate their survival and growth at Fayetteville and Hope, Arkansas, U.S., and to evaluate their response to two irrigation regimes at Fayetteville. After four growing seasons, the overall tree survival was 62% and 30% at Fayetteville and Hope, respectively. Betula pendula 'Trost's Dwarf', B. ermanii, and B. albosinensis were among genotypes with the lowest survival at both locations. Betula populifolia, B. nigra 'BNMTF', B. nigra 'Cully', and B. × 'Royal Frost' had greater survival after four growing seasons than the other birch genotypes investigated. Betula nigra 'BNMTF' and B. nigra 'Cully' were taller and had greater trunk diameter than the other surviving birch genotypes at both locations after four growing seasons. At the end of 2005, B. utilis var. jacquemontii was the shortest and had the smallest trunk diameter among the 18 surviving genotypes at Fayetteville, and B. papyrifera 'Uenci', B. populifolia 'Whitespire', B. maximowicziana, and B. lenta were the shortest and had the smallest trunk diameter among the 13 surviving genotypes at Hope. At Fayetteville, B. nigra and B. davurica had the greatest annual change in tree height in both 2004 and 2005, and B. davurica was among genotypes having the greatest annual change in trunk diameter in 2002, 2004, and 2005. At Hope, B. papyrifera had the greatest annual change in tree height in both 2004 and 2005, and B. davurica had the greatest annual change in trunk diameter in 2004. In 2005, annual change was not significant among birch genotypes at Hope. At Fayetteville, water-stress treatment reduced final tree height and trunk diameter in birch trees. © 2007 International Society of Arboriculture.

author list (cited authors)

  • Gu, M., Robbins, J. A., & Rom, C. R.

publication date

  • July 2007