Melek, Zeki (2007-12). Interactive simulation of fire, burn and decomposition. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This work presents an approach to effectively integrate into one unified modular fire simulation framework the major processes related to fire, namely: a burning process, chemical combustion, heat distribution, decomposition and deformation of burning solids, and rigid body simulation of the residue. Simulators for every stage are described, and the modular structure enables switching to different simulators if more accuracy or more interactivity is desired. A "Stable Fluids" based three gas system is used to model the combustion process, and the heat generated during the combustion is used to drive the flow of the hot air. Objects, if exposed to enough heat, ignite and start burning. The decomposition of the burning object is modeled as a level set method, driven by the pyrolysis process, where the burning object releases combustible gases. Secondary deformation effects, such as bending burning matches and crumpling burning paper, are modeled as a proxy based deformation. Physically based simulation, done at interactive rates, enables the user to ef- ficiently test different setups, as well as interact and change the conditions during the simulation. The graphics card is used to generate additional frames for real-time visualization. This work further proposes a method for controlling and directing high resolution simulations. An interactive coarse resolution simulation is provided to the user as a "preview" to control and achieve the desired simulation behavior. A higher resolution "final" simulation that creates all the fine scale behavior is matched to the preview simulation such that the preview and final simulations behave in a similar manner. In this dissertation, we highlighted a gap within the CG community for the simulation of fire. There has not previously been a physically based yet interactive simulation for fire. This dissertation describes a unified simulation framework for physically based simulation of fire and burning. Our results show that our implementation can model fire, objects catching fire, burning objects, decomposition of burning objects, and additional secondary deformations. The results are plausible even at interactive frame rates, and controllable.
  • This work presents an approach to effectively integrate into one unified modular
    fire simulation framework the major processes related to fire, namely: a burning
    process, chemical combustion, heat distribution, decomposition and deformation of
    burning solids, and rigid body simulation of the residue. Simulators for every stage
    are described, and the modular structure enables switching to different simulators if
    more accuracy or more interactivity is desired. A "Stable Fluids" based three gas
    system is used to model the combustion process, and the heat generated during the
    combustion is used to drive the flow of the hot air. Objects, if exposed to enough
    heat, ignite and start burning. The decomposition of the burning object is modeled as
    a level set method, driven by the pyrolysis process, where the burning object releases
    combustible gases. Secondary deformation effects, such as bending burning matches
    and crumpling burning paper, are modeled as a proxy based deformation.
    Physically based simulation, done at interactive rates, enables the user to ef-
    ficiently test different setups, as well as interact and change the conditions during
    the simulation. The graphics card is used to generate additional frames for real-time
    visualization.
    This work further proposes a method for controlling and directing high resolution
    simulations. An interactive coarse resolution simulation is provided to the user as a "preview" to control and achieve the desired simulation behavior. A higher resolution
    "final" simulation that creates all the fine scale behavior is matched to the preview
    simulation such that the preview and final simulations behave in a similar manner.
    In this dissertation, we highlighted a gap within the CG community for the
    simulation of fire. There has not previously been a physically based yet interactive
    simulation for fire. This dissertation describes a unified simulation framework for
    physically based simulation of fire and burning. Our results show that our implementation
    can model fire, objects catching fire, burning objects, decomposition of
    burning objects, and additional secondary deformations. The results are plausible
    even at interactive frame rates, and controllable.

publication date

  • December 2007