Arghode, Vishal (2013-05). Exploring Engaging Instructions: Cases of University Professors and Corporate Trainers in the United States. Doctoral Dissertation. Thesis uri icon

abstract

  • This journal-article-formatted dissertation explores university professors' and trainers' practices in engaging students in their classrooms. By systematically examining the current literature related to engaging instruction, I identified the core components of engaging instruction, as well as the strategies to effectively engage students. Despite the paucity of available empirical studies investigating the 'engagement' concept for professors and trainers, the available studies were examined to understand how researchers conceptualized and operationalized "effective engagement." Findings from this literature review provided a theoretical foundation for the research. I explored the perceptions and practices of college professors regarding engaging instruction. I interviewed seven professors face-to-face. Subsequently, I analyzed the interview transcripts using the constant comparative method. Findings from the study showed that the participants had varied views. Nevertheless, they agreed that an engaging professor must focus on learning; consider various aspects of students' personal development including their cognitive, social, and emotional development; and take care of different student learning styles, for example, visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Participants expressed the importance of student engagement. Body language, verbal and non-verbal cues, and eye contact were the main parameters used by the participants to evaluate student engagement. Participants also emphasized the importance of asking questions, judging from student responses and assessing instructional effectiveness by evaluating the questions asked by students. Similarly, I also explored seven trainers' perceptions on engaging instruction and the strategies they used for engaging trainees by conducting face-to-face interviews. I utilized the constant comparison method to analyze the interview transcripts. Major findings indicate that trainers should be trainee-centered in instruction, accommodate different learning styles, elicit trainee participation by creating an encouraging class environment, and connect with trainees by building rapport early in a training session.
  • This journal-article-formatted dissertation explores university professors' and trainers' practices in engaging students in their classrooms. By systematically examining the current literature related to engaging instruction, I identified the core components of engaging instruction, as well as the strategies to effectively engage students. Despite the paucity of available empirical studies investigating the 'engagement' concept for professors and trainers, the available studies were examined to understand how researchers conceptualized and operationalized "effective engagement." Findings from this literature review provided a theoretical foundation for the research. I explored the perceptions and practices of college professors regarding engaging instruction. I interviewed seven professors face-to-face. Subsequently, I analyzed the interview transcripts using the constant comparative method. Findings from the study showed that the participants had varied views. Nevertheless, they agreed that an engaging professor must focus on learning; consider various aspects of students' personal development including their cognitive, social, and emotional development; and take care of different student learning styles, for example, visual, auditory, and kinesthetic. Participants expressed the importance of student engagement. Body language, verbal and non-verbal cues, and eye contact were the main parameters used by the participants to evaluate student engagement. Participants also emphasized the importance of asking questions, judging from student responses and assessing instructional effectiveness by evaluating the questions asked by students.

    Similarly, I also explored seven trainers' perceptions on engaging instruction and the strategies they used for engaging trainees by conducting face-to-face interviews. I utilized the constant comparison method to analyze the interview transcripts. Major findings indicate that trainers should be trainee-centered in instruction, accommodate different learning styles, elicit trainee participation by creating an encouraging class environment, and connect with trainees by building rapport early in a training session.

publication date

  • May 2013