The effect of lysophosphatidic acid using a hydrogel or collagen sponge carrier on bone healing in dogs Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVES: The purposes of this study were to determine: 1) the efficacy of polycaprolactone-g-polyethylene glycol (PCL-g-PEG) and polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA-g-PEG) hydrogels and an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) as carriers for lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), 2) the effect of LPA on bone healing in dogs, and 3) the ideal dose of LPA to maximally stimulate bone healing. METHODS: Bilateral ulnar ostectomies were performed on purpose bred dogs. Control defects were filled with a PCL-g-PEG or PLGA-g-PEG hydrogel, or a saline soaked ACS. Contralateral defects were filled with a PCL-g-PEG or PLGA-g-PEG hydrogel, or an ACS with each carrying differing concentrations of an LPA solution. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) was performed. Total bone area (TBA), mineral density (BMD), and mineral content (BMC) were determined at each time point. Relationships between the effect of treatment over time on TBA, BMC and BMD were determined. RESULTS: Phase 1 - There was no significant difference in DXA-based TBA (p = 0.09), BMC (p = 0.33), or BMD (p = 0.74) over time between LPA treatments, or between the LPA treated and control groups TBA (p = 0.95), BMC (p = 0.99), or BMD (p = 0.46). Phase 2 - There was no significant difference over time between LPA treatments in DXA-based TBA (p = 0.33), BMC (p = 0.45), or BMD (p = 0.43), or between the LPA treated and control groups TBA (p = 0.94), BMC (p = 0.38), or BMD (p = 0.17). Phase 3 - There was no significant difference over time between LPA treatments in DXA-based TBA (p = 0.78), BMC (p = 0.88), or BMD (p = 0.35), or between the LPA treated and control groups TBA (p = 0.07), BMC (p = 0.85), or BMD (p = 0.06). There was a significant increase in TBA (p <0.0001) and BMC (p = 0.0014), but a significant decrease in BMD (p <0.0001) was noted over time when all groups were combined. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although LPA has shown promise as an osteoinductive agent in research, its performance as a bone graft substitute, as utilized in this study, is unsupported. Further studies are necessary to determine the incorporation and elution kinetics of LPA from the PLGA-g-PEG hydrogel and from an ACS. Hydrogels may have clinical applications for delaying or preventing bone formation.

altmetric score

  • 1.25

author list (cited authors)

  • Might, K. R., Martinez, S. A., Karin, N., Lin, G., Tarasevich, B., & Pool, R. R.

citation count

  • 2

publication date

  • July 2016